Collapsed sea defences to be shored up

WORK is due to begin today on restoring vital sea defences which collapsed during storms earlier this year.A further 1,500 tonnes of rock was delivered to Felixstowe on Monday to build two 50-metre stretches of protective rock barriers in front of the sea wall.

WORK is due to begin today on restoring vital sea defences which collapsed during storms earlier this year.

A further 1,500 tonnes of rock was delivered to Felixstowe on Monday to build two 50-metre stretches of protective rock barriers in front of the sea wall.

The work follows earlier restoration which took place in the summer and brings the total cost of the project to £500,000.

Andy Smith, deputy leader of Suffolk Coastal District Council and cabinet member for coast protection, said: “Basically, from today, our contractors will be extending the 350 metres length of emergency work carried out during the summer by a further 50 metres on either side.


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“This is a precautionary measure which we expect will prevent a repeat of the situation at the end of May when part of the sea wall collapsed and the promenade cracked in several places.

“We have been unsuccessful in gaining the necessary Government funding to carry out the planned groyne replacement programme that would provide this area of Felixstowe with the long-term defences that our community really needs and deserves.

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“Until that funding is finally approved, we will continue to do our best to provide effective but temporary protection but there will continue to be a significant risk of storm damage to the defences which remain vulnerable.”

The work is expected to take two weeks to complete and will be undertaken by Ipswich-based Brooks and Wood. Additional rocks will be left on the beach as a reserve in case severe weather creates a need later in the winter to carry out rebuilding or extension of defences.

Mr Smith added: “Work will take place only when the tides are out, and there will be only minor inconvenience to the many people who like to walk along the prom.

“We will this time be transporting the rock along the beach so there will be no need to fence off a long length of the prom, except for the occasional movement of rock from the compound in Manor Terrace on to the beach.

“We have put in place timber steps over the rock defences installed during the summer, so there is still access down to the beach. The rocks are there for a purpose and are not a playground so I would ask people to please not attempt to climb over them.”

The council hopes the Government will approve its bid for a £5million groyne replacement scheme to allow the project to proceed next year.

danielle.nuttall@eadt.co.uk

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