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Could this Bury St Edmunds home with indoor cinema and underground car park be yours for £1.45m?

PUBLISHED: 10:01 25 April 2017 | UPDATED: 08:59 26 April 2017

Norman Tower House in Bury St Edmunds which is up for sale for �1.45m. Picture: BEDFORDS

Norman Tower House in Bury St Edmunds which is up for sale for �1.45m. Picture: BEDFORDS

Archant

Many dream of having their own private cinema but behind the doors of a £1.45m Bury St Edmunds home this is exactly what you will find – along with a roof garden and an underground car park

The inside of the Norman Tower House in Bury St Edmunds. Picture: BEDFORDSThe inside of the Norman Tower House in Bury St Edmunds. Picture: BEDFORDS

In the heart of historic Bury, a heritage-listed building is up for sale that has undergone an incredible transformation.

As you would expect from the name, Norman Tower House lies in the shadow of the bell tower next to St Edmundsbury Cathedral.

It has been meticulously renovated in recent years and now blends Gothic period features with modern conveniences, including a seven-seat private cinema, a hot tub on the first-floor roof garden, and parking for three or four cars underground.

It has been marketed at £1.45m by Bedfords and partner James Bedford said there had been a “steady” interest in the home so far.

The seven-seat private cinema located inside Norman Tower House in Bury St Edmunds. Picture: BEDFORDSThe seven-seat private cinema located inside Norman Tower House in Bury St Edmunds. Picture: BEDFORDS

“You never know with something like that, it’s very unique and individual,” he said.

“There’s been a good amount of interest. We’re pleased with the response and if I’m honest we’ve had a couple of near misses.

“Bury is on the map and is a destination with its own draw, from the cathedral to the theatre to a music scene.”

From the street or churchyard below, passers-by would be unaware the building had a first-floor garden.

The inside of the Norman Tower House in Bury St Edmunds. Picture: BEDFORDSThe inside of the Norman Tower House in Bury St Edmunds. Picture: BEDFORDS

“To sit on the roof garden and look up and see the sky or the cathedral tower is pretty special,” James said.

As a Bury Society blue plaque on an outside wall indicates, the property was designed by Suffolk architect Lewis Nockalls Cottingham and built in 1846.

It was opened as The Savings Bank but was known locally as the Penny Bank. It closed in 1892 after 46 years.

Cottingham also worked on the parish church in Horringer and was responsible for restorations to St Mary’s Church in Bury in the mid-19th century.

The inside of the Norman Tower House in Bury St Edmunds. Picture: BEDFORDSThe inside of the Norman Tower House in Bury St Edmunds. Picture: BEDFORDS

Partner Paul Bedford added: “The standard of craftsmanship and finish in this property is exceptional, with fine materials and fittings throughout.

“There are original arched oak doors, limestone floors, moulded ceilings and hand-carved fireplaces.

“An oak staircase leads to the bedrooms, and the kitchen has been fitted in a high-quality, painted Shaker-style, with grey marble worktops and oak-topped central island.”

Norman Tower House is on the market with Bedfords at £1.45m.

The roof garden and hot tub at Norman Tower House in Bury St Edmunds. Picture: BEDFORDSThe roof garden and hot tub at Norman Tower House in Bury St Edmunds. Picture: BEDFORDS

Contact Paul Bedford on 01284 769999 for more details.

The inside of the Norman Tower House in Bury St Edmunds. Picture: BEDFORDSThe inside of the Norman Tower House in Bury St Edmunds. Picture: BEDFORDS

Norman Tower House in Bury St Edmunds, which is up for sale for £1.45m. Picture: BEDFORDSNorman Tower House in Bury St Edmunds, which is up for sale for £1.45m. Picture: BEDFORDS


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