Fifty shades of yellow? Takeaway's choice of paint sparks discussion

Henry Saltmarsh, who lives near the Noodle King building, said the new shade of yellow is "acceptable" 

Henry Saltmarsh, who lives near the Noodle King building, said the new shade of yellow is "acceptable" - Credit: Mariam Ghaemi

The shade of yellow paint on a new Chinese takeaway in Bury St Edmunds' central conservation area has become a talking point.

Noodle King in a Grade-II listed building on the corner of Guildhall Street and Westgate Street was initially painted in a bright shade of yellow, described as garish by some, but a further coat has toned it down. 

West Suffolk Council said they had not received an application for the paintwork and signage, which require listed...

West Suffolk Council said they had not received an application for the paintwork and signage, which require listed building consent. The picture shows the most up-to-date colour of paint - Credit: Mariam Ghaemi

Henry Saltmarsh, a neighbour to the business, said in his opinion the new shade was "acceptable", but he still has concerns about the signage which is brightly illuminated at night.

A spokesman for West Suffolk Council confirmed they had not received an application for the paintwork and signage, which require listed building consent.

The spokesman said: "We will be speaking to the owners about both to rectify this."


You may also want to watch:


A spokesperson for Noodle King claimed they had struggled to get hold of anyone at the council over works at the building - which used to be Golden Dragon Chinese takeaway - but had had communication over the windows.

They said they had themselves taken the decision to tone down the yellow as it was too bright.

Henry Saltmarsh said the first coat of yellow was "objectionable"

Henry Saltmarsh said the first coat of yellow was "objectionable" - Credit: Henry Saltmarsh

Most Read

Mr Saltmarsh, 74, described the first coat of yellow as "very bright and loud" and "just ridiculous", but now the shade is "more of a sand colour and less sharp, but still quite bright".

"I don't find the colour offensive now," he added.

Bury town guide Martyn Taylor. Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

Bury town guide and chairman of the Bury Society Martyn Taylor - Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

Martyn Taylor, of the Bury Society, which has a role in protecting the town's heritage, said: "It's not that the Bury Society is against people trying to spruce up their properties. It's not that at all.

"If everybody thought they could do what they wanted as and when they thought so we would have all sorts of coloured properties all over the town.

"The rules and regulations are there to be adhered to.

"If you live in a historic town in a conservation area, then you have certain responsibilities."

Henry said this photo shows the second coat being applied, a slightly more sandy colour as can be seen to the righthand...

Henry said this photo shows the second coat being applied, a slightly more sandy colour as can be seen to the righthand side where they are working - Credit: Henry Saltmarsh

He said the original "buttercup yellow" was "in your face", but agreed it was now muted down and not too dissimilar to the shade of a nearby building.

The Noodle King spokesperson said they had chosen yellow to tie in with their branding.

The council spokesman said: "One of our conservation officers did speak to them about windows, but there was no mention at the time about the paintwork and signage which require listed building consent and we haven’t received an application for this."

They added: “We are aware of the work carried out and that we are looking into it further.”

Noodle King opens for takeaway on March 15.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus