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Rapid turnaround for care home rated ‘inadequate’ twice in a year

PUBLISHED: 11:30 05 March 2020 | UPDATED: 12:52 05 March 2020

Crouched Friars Residential Home in Colchester, which has been lifted out of special measurs. Inset: Paulina Eagle, Tanya and Maria from the care team, and resident Eva  Pictures: GOOGLE MAPS/CROUCHED FRIARS

Crouched Friars Residential Home in Colchester, which has been lifted out of special measurs. Inset: Paulina Eagle, Tanya and Maria from the care team, and resident Eva Pictures: GOOGLE MAPS/CROUCHED FRIARS

GOOGLE MAPS/CROUCHED FRIARS

Staff at a Colchester care home plunged into special measures twice in one year have been praised for a rapid turnaround and new inspection rating of ‘requires improvement’.

The culture at Crouched Friars Residential Home, in Crouch Street, was found to have improved after an inspection in February this year - with new staff hired and refurbishments made to the premises.

Six months earlier, the home for people with dementia received a damning review from Care Quality Commission (CQC) inspectors who rated it 'inadequate' in all areas.

MORE: 'Unexplained bruising' among major concerns at 'inadequate' care home

There were questions over its future with concerns raised about residents receiving "unexplained bruising".

Now, although experts noted more change is needed, Crouched Friars has been lifted out of special measures - with inspectors giving it a 'good' rating for care provided at the home.

Manager Paulina Eagle said: "We are working extremely hard to address further improvements required and the team continues to work very closely with the CQC and local authority to ensure our residents are safe.

"We have now fully recruited an experienced care staff team who are involved in an ongoing development and training programme, and we are confident that each inspection will be an improvement on the last.

"We want to thank staff for their motivation and dedication and residents and relatives for their patience while we go through this transition period."

'Positive feedback from families'

However, inspectors found on their February visit that some aspects of the service were not always safe - and there was "limited assurance about safety".

There was also an increased risk that people could be harmed, they said.

But inspectors did find people were treated with compassion, kindness, dignity and respect.

"The service was improving and feedback from people, relatives and staff was positive," inspectors wrote in a subsequent report published today.

"There were systems and processes in place to protect people from abuse.

"Staff had received training and were clear about the need to escalate matters of concerns such as bruising.

"Risk assessments were in place on areas such as health and safety, equipment and the environment."

One relative told inspectors: "The carers have really got to know my relative so well. They keep them lovely and clean and always have nice clean clothes on."

Another added: "Whenever I come in, the staff always say hello and make me feel welcome."

The home, now out of special measures, will be revisited in due course.

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