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Days Gone By: Memories of hundreds of working horses and their drinking troughs

PUBLISHED: 12:19 08 May 2018

Workmen with their horses around 1930s. The location of this picture, taken by Ipswich photographers The Titshall Brothers, is unknown. Do you recognise the houses in the background? Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVE

Workmen with their horses around 1930s. The location of this picture, taken by Ipswich photographers The Titshall Brothers, is unknown. Do you recognise the houses in the background? Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVE

Dave Kindred

Working horses on our streets are a very rare sight now and are usually for demonstration or promotional events. The same is true in farming, with horse power replaced in another form.

The Cornhill, Ipswich, in 1907 with a group of children gathered round a drinking trough for the cab mens horses. The South Africa War Memorial behind the trough was unveiled the year before. It now stands in Christchurch Park. This photograph was taken from the steps of the Town Hall. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVEThe Cornhill, Ipswich, in 1907 with a group of children gathered round a drinking trough for the cab mens horses. The South Africa War Memorial behind the trough was unveiled the year before. It now stands in Christchurch Park. This photograph was taken from the steps of the Town Hall. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVE

Until the early 1960s it was not uncommon for the milkman, butcher and baker on the daily round to use a horse-drawn cart. Sheila Whiting, from Witnesham, has written with recollections of the drinking troughs that were around Ipswich for the hundreds of horses in daily use by cab drivers and delivery men of all trades.

The last drinking trough to be removed from Ipswich was probably the one at the junction of Princes Street and Portman Road. It was removed in November 1961. It had stood outside the front door of what is now the offices of the East Anglian Daily Times and Ipswich Star, formally a building used by Churchman’s, the cigarette and cigar makers.

Sheila Whiting wrote: Walking through Ipswich recently I had a look at the work being done on the Cornhill and that reminded me of an old photograph of horse carriages and a horse drinking trough there. Does anybody know what happened to it? There was another trough in Princes Street, at the junction with Portman Road and one at the top of Bishops Hill.

The drinking trough for horses at the junction of Princes Street and Portman Road, Ipswich, being removed in November 1961. It was on the route from the rail station to the town centre and close to the livestock market. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVE 

The drinking trough for horses at the junction of Princes Street and Portman Road, Ipswich, being removed in November 1961. It was on the route from the rail station to the town centre and close to the livestock market. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVE

Do you have memories you would like to share with readers? To submit a letter, in less than 300 words, write to David Kindred, Days Gone By, Ipswich Star/EADT, Portman House, 120 Princes Street, Ipswich, IP1 1RS or e-mail info@kindred-spirit.co.uk

A busy day on the Cornhill, Ipswich, in the early years of the twentieth century, as drivers wait for customers with their horse drawn cabs. A wagon from the Great Eastern Railway Company was turning into Westgate Street. This photograph was taken from the window of Grimwade’s shop, looking into Tavern Street. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVE 
A busy day on the Cornhill, Ipswich, in the early years of the twentieth century, as drivers wait for customers with their horse drawn cabs. A wagon from the Great Eastern Railway Company was turning into Westgate Street. This photograph was taken from the window of Grimwade’s shop, looking into Tavern Street. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVE

The fire brigade relied on horse power to pull their steam pumps. The Ipswich Barracks helped the brigade with men and horses. This photograph was taken at the Norwich Road, Ipswich, railway bridge early in the twentieth century as members of the brigade and soldiers from the Ipswich Barracks lined up for a parade through the town centre. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVEThe fire brigade relied on horse power to pull their steam pumps. The Ipswich Barracks helped the brigade with men and horses. This photograph was taken at the Norwich Road, Ipswich, railway bridge early in the twentieth century as members of the brigade and soldiers from the Ipswich Barracks lined up for a parade through the town centre. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVE

The drinking trough at the junction of Bishops Hill, Felixstowe Road and Nacton Road, Ipswich, in the early years of the twentieth century. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVE 

The drinking trough at the junction of Bishops Hill, Felixstowe Road and Nacton Road, Ipswich, in the early years of the twentieth century. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVE

A drinking trough at the junction of Derby Road and Foxhall Road, Ipswich, in 1948. The Railway Hotel was also the site of the Bricklayer's Arms and the California Rose. It has been named The Railway since the 1880s. The Westerfield to Felixstowe line opened in May 1887 and Derby Road Station is close by. Houses have been built recently in what was the hotel car park. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVEA drinking trough at the junction of Derby Road and Foxhall Road, Ipswich, in 1948. The Railway Hotel was also the site of the Bricklayer's Arms and the California Rose. It has been named The Railway since the 1880s. The Westerfield to Felixstowe line opened in May 1887 and Derby Road Station is close by. Houses have been built recently in what was the hotel car park. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVE

This baker was on his rounds with his delivery boy in Fonnereau Road, Ipswich, around 1910. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVE 
This baker was on his rounds with his delivery boy in Fonnereau Road, Ipswich, around 1910. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVE


The Ipswich livestock market site between Princes Street and Portman Road, Ipswich, in the late Victorian period, when horses were part of regular trading. This picture taken from the Princes Street side is where the offices of the East Anglian Daily Times and Ipswich Star now stand. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVE 
The Ipswich livestock market site between Princes Street and Portman Road, Ipswich, in the late Victorian period, when horses were part of regular trading. This picture taken from the Princes Street side is where the offices of the East Anglian Daily Times and Ipswich Star now stand. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVE

A fire destroyed buildings on a site bound by Norwich Road, Waterloo Road and Wellington Street in January 1909. One of the buildings was a stable and a gang of men smashed a hole in the back wall in Wellington Street to let the terrified horses out. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVE 
A fire destroyed buildings on a site bound by Norwich Road, Waterloo Road and Wellington Street in January 1909. One of the buildings was a stable and a gang of men smashed a hole in the back wall in Wellington Street to let the terrified horses out. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVE

Some of the rescued horses the day after the fire in January 1909. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVESome of the rescued horses the day after the fire in January 1909. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVE

Mercers butchers shop at 28 Upper Brook Street, Ipswich, had a delivery service by horse and buggy. Mercers shop is now the site of Wilkinsons store. St Stephen's Lane is behind the driver. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVEMercers butchers shop at 28 Upper Brook Street, Ipswich, had a delivery service by horse and buggy. Mercers shop is now the site of Wilkinsons store. St Stephen's Lane is behind the driver. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVE

A wagon from Ladbrook and sons of Elmsett at the junction of Commercial Road and Wolsey Street, Ipswich, in the early years of the twentieth century. The company carried grain to Ipswich Dock. The driver, Mr Shippings, also used to shop in Ipswich for residents of Elmsett. The Cobbold public house in the background was the Three Tuns, which closed in the 1940. The building was used as a canteen for staff of William Brown timber merchants. On the right was the Great Eastern Railway Tavern, which closed in 1908. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVE 
A wagon from Ladbrook and sons of Elmsett at the junction of Commercial Road and Wolsey Street, Ipswich, in the early years of the twentieth century. The company carried grain to Ipswich Dock. The driver, Mr Shippings, also used to shop in Ipswich for residents of Elmsett. The Cobbold public house in the background was the Three Tuns, which closed in the 1940. The building was used as a canteen for staff of William Brown timber merchants. On the right was the Great Eastern Railway Tavern, which closed in 1908. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVE

There was a horse-drawn bus service, from the Cornhill to the Ostrich public house, near Bourne Bridge, when this photograph was taken in 1898. Picture: HARRY WALTERSThere was a horse-drawn bus service, from the Cornhill to the Ostrich public house, near Bourne Bridge, when this photograph was taken in 1898. Picture: HARRY WALTERS

A horse-drawn cab in Westgate Street, Ipswich, in 1897 during the celebrations for Queen Victorias Diamond Jubilee. This photograph was taken from close to the junction with Museum Street looking towards the Cornhill. Picture: HARRY WALTERSA horse-drawn cab in Westgate Street, Ipswich, in 1897 during the celebrations for Queen Victorias Diamond Jubilee. This photograph was taken from close to the junction with Museum Street looking towards the Cornhill. Picture: HARRY WALTERS

Soldiers at the Ipswich Barracks with their horses around 1930. In 1795 barracks were built north of the Norwich Road and London Road junction, Ipswich. Parts of the wall and gate posts are still in Barrack Lane, off Barrack Corner. The houses of Geneva Road and Cecil Road were built after the barracks were closed and demolished in the 1930s. The Royal Field Artillery and the Royal Horse Artillery were based there. Picture: THE TITSHALL BROTHERS 
Soldiers at the Ipswich Barracks with their horses around 1930. In 1795 barracks were built north of the Norwich Road and London Road junction, Ipswich. Parts of the wall and gate posts are still in Barrack Lane, off Barrack Corner. The houses of Geneva Road and Cecil Road were built after the barracks were closed and demolished in the 1930s. The Royal Field Artillery and the Royal Horse Artillery were based there. Picture: THE TITSHALL BROTHERS

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