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‘We need to avoid this total madness and win back our futures’ - Delia Smith speaks out against Brexit at People’s Vote march in London

PUBLISHED: 10:00 21 October 2018 | UPDATED: 16:42 21 October 2018

Delia Smith addresses Anti-Brexit campaigners at a rally after the People's Vote March for the Future in London, a march and rally in support of a second EU referendum. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Saturday October 20, 2018. See PA story POLITICS Brexit Protest. Photo credit should read: Yui Mok/PA Wire

Delia Smith addresses Anti-Brexit campaigners at a rally after the People's Vote March for the Future in London, a march and rally in support of a second EU referendum. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Saturday October 20, 2018. See PA story POLITICS Brexit Protest. Photo credit should read: Yui Mok/PA Wire

Television chef and majority Norwich City shareholder Delia Smith spoke out against Brexit during the People’s Vote march in London.

Mrs Smith was one of many celebrities to throw their weight behind the Brexit protest, attended by more than 650,000 people, according to organisers.

Others included Dragons’ Den businesswoman Deborah Meaden, The Lord of The Ring’s actor Andy Serkis, comedian Jenny Eclair, presenter Richard Bacon and TV chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, who tweeted: “Theresa May is cooking up a Brexit disaster. I’m with Delia.”

Speaking at the event, Mrs Smith said people were not fully informed when they voted but now understood “the dire consequences”.

“The only way we can avoid this total madness and win back our future has to be a People’s Vote.”

Mrs Smith claims political leaders have made a “dog’s dinner” 
out of Brexit.

She agreed to fund free coach travel for people to take part in the People’s Vote March, on Saturday.

She is one of several household names, including Sir Patrick Stewart and Ian McEwan, 
who have paid more than £1,000 for a coach.

Mrs Smith, who has sponsored a coach called the ‘East Anglia Express’, told this newspaper before the march: “I am petrified 
at the way Brexit is going. 


“I’m afraid the political leaders have made a dog’s dinner of it and none of us really trust them anymore to take final decision, whatever the result the of negotiations.”

Sadiq Khan, the Mayor of London, speaking ahead of his platform appearance, said: “Today will go down as an historic moment in our democracy. A moment when in their thousands, people from every corner of our country and every section of our society will take to the streets - coming to make our voice heard.

“We’ve heard some complain that a public vote would be undemocratic and unpatriotic. But the opposite is true. There’s nothing more democratic - nothing more British - than trusting the people to have the final say on our future.

“The lies, the mistruths and the deceptions of the referendum campaign have now been exposed, and it’s clear the will of the people is changing. No one voted to leave the EU to make themselves poorer. No one voted to make life harder for our children and grandchildren. No one voted to see our NHS damaged. And no one voted for the shambles that this Government has created.”

The organisers of the People’s Vote protest have claimed 670,000 people attended the rally on Saturday.

A spokesman for the group said that the number is an estimate based on information from stewards along the route.

They said that the number had been put to police at the protest, who would not confirm or deny the estimated number claimed by the People’s Vote.

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