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Cancer victim died after being turned away by doctors more than 10 times

PUBLISHED: 06:41 20 October 2020 | UPDATED: 07:04 22 October 2020

Neepy was just 26 years old when she died in July. Picture: FAMILY/PA WIRE

Neepy was just 26 years old when she died in July. Picture: FAMILY/PA WIRE

A “kind-hearted, bubbly” young woman died of cancer after she was turned away from doctors more than 10 times - three years after she first complained of foot pain.

Neepy from Rowhedge wanted to be a hairdresser, but her opportunities were cut short by cancer. Picture: FAMILY/PA WIRENeepy from Rowhedge wanted to be a hairdresser, but her opportunities were cut short by cancer. Picture: FAMILY/PA WIRE

Dhneep Bains, known as Neepy, first sought help from medical professionals in March 2017, but was not diagnosed until early 2018.

The 26-year-old, who lived in Rowhedge, near Colchester, was seen by several different doctors on a rotation at her surgery and had been recommended to ride a bike, do stretches and yoga.

She was taken to A&E in April 2018, crying in pain and dragging her leg behind her, and only scanned when her mother Ram Waltho-Barr demanded it.

The aspiring hairdresser was then diagnosed with Stage 4 Ewing Sarcoma of the pelvis and a secondary growth on the lung.

Dhneep Bains, known as Neepy, was turned away by doctors more than 10 times before being diagnosed with cancer. Picture: FAMILY/PA WIREDhneep Bains, known as Neepy, was turned away by doctors more than 10 times before being diagnosed with cancer. Picture: FAMILY/PA WIRE

She endured 26 rounds of chemotherapy and up to eight weeks of radiotherapy before her tragic death.

Her mother is sharing her heartbreaking story in the hope of encouraging more early cancer diagnoses in young people.

Mrs Waltho-Barr said: “Parents shouldn’t have to lose their child at such an early age.

“Neepy was very kind-hearted, bubbly, she was fun to be around and she had a great sense of humour, always joking, smiling, no matter what.”

Neepy's mother is now sharing her story to raise awareness for the Teenage Cancer Trust's #BestToCheck campaign. Picture: FAMILY/PA WIRENeepy's mother is now sharing her story to raise awareness for the Teenage Cancer Trust's #BestToCheck campaign. Picture: FAMILY/PA WIRE

Neepy told her mother: “I don’t want anybody else to suffer like I’ve had to suffer.”

Her story is being shared as part of Teenage Cancer Trust’s #BestToCheck campaign.

It calls on doctors to make referrals at the earliest opportunity, even when they think everything is most likely be okay.

The campaign also reminds young people of the common signs and symptoms of cancer and, despite the pressure coronavirus has placed on the NHS, urges them to contact their GP at the earliest opportunity.

Mrs Waltho-Brar added: “For me, it’s important to get this awareness out there for her sake, for her memory’s sake as well, and for everybody else actually too.

“Everybody should be given that chance of early diagnosis.”

Dr Louise Soanes, director of services at Teenage Cancer Trust, said: “Cancer is thankfully rare in teenagers and young adults, accounting for just one percent of all cancer diagnosis.

“However, because cancer is less common in this age group, they often have to visit their doctor numerous times before they get a diagnosis.”


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