Drunk driver shopped by sister

A TEENAGER who moved his car a few feet in an Ipswich car park while drunk has been banned from driving after his sister alerted the police.

A TEENAGER who moved his car a few feet in an Ipswich car park while drunk has been banned from driving after his sister alerted the police.

Scott Gilardoni drove the car to a parking space closer to CCTV at Cardinal Park after deciding to leave it there for the night because he had drunk too much.

The 18-year-old, of Westholme Road, had driven friends to Liquid nightclub but then been persuaded to drink with them, South East Suffolk Magistrates' Court heard.

He telephoned his mother to ask for a lift home but his sister had spotted him getting into the car outside the club and called the police because she thought her brother was going to attempt to drive home while drunk.

Lesla Small, prosecuting, said Gilardoni suffered with Aspergers Syndrome and when police tried to arrest him he swore and spat at an officer due to his condition.

Ms Small said: “He swore at the officer and when the officer took hold of him he pulled away and spat at the officer's face and chest. He ran off and had to be detained.”

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Gilardoni was breathalysed and found to have 88 micrograms of alcohol in 100 millilitres of breath. The legal limit is 35 micrograms.

Gilardoni, of previous good character, pleaded guilty to driving with excess alcohol and to assaulting a police officer.

Claire Hullock, mitigating, said Gilardoni's mother arrived at the car park as the arrest was being made and had tried to explain to the police that her son's condition made him “volatile”.

District Judge David Cooper fined Gilardoni £150 and told him to pay £100 compensation to the officer and £80 costs.

The defendant, who works part-time, was disqualified from driving for 12 months but told the ban would be reduced to nine months if he completed the Drink Driver's Rehabilitation Course.

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