School tells parents how to deal with 'scary matters' after Squid Game release

Some schools have been contacting parents over Squid Game on Netflix, which is not suitable for children under 15.

Some schools have been contacting parents over Squid Game on Netflix, which is not suitable for children under 15. - Credit: Netflix

Schools are contacting parents over the violent Netflix show Squid Game after its popularity has filtered down to the playground.

The Korean show has an age rating of 15 and sees innocent children's games turn deadly.

It is Netflix's biggest debut hit, pulling in 111 million fans in less than four weeks.

Nationally, some schools have been warning parents not to let their children watch the show, with its gruesome scenes.

Sebert Wood Community Primary School in Bury St Edmunds is supporting parents over how to talk to children about "scary matters" following Squid Game's release.

The Korean show Squid Game is Netflix's biggest debut hit.

The Korean show Squid Game is Netflix's biggest debut hit. - Credit: Netflix


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In an email to parents, James Tottie, online safety lead at Sebert Wood Community Primary School, said: "You may have seen media reports about a Netflix series called Squid Game which some children in school have been talking about and relating to information on TikTok.

"Squid Game is currently the most watched show in 90 countries and nearly all episodes of the '15' rated show contain violent and gruesome scenes which are inappropriate for primary aged children. TikTok has an age rating of 13.

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"When scary things are talked about in the media this often creates a sense of alarm which can become self-fulfilling. Experts advise that if you talk to children about such matters it is usually best not to name the frightening content specifically but talk about it in more general terms."

Sebert Wood Community Primary School in Bury St Edmunds Picture: GOOGLE MAPS

Sebert Wood Community Primary School in Bury St Edmunds. - Credit: Google

In an email to this publication, Mr Tottie, who is also deputy head, said as with many up-and-coming popular TV series in the public domain they often find some of their older pupils will be aware of them.

He said: "By updating parents and carers of new themes and trends in the digital world, we hope they will feel better informed to deal with any issues their child may raise. In school we place great emphasis on promoting e-safety and encouraging pupils to alert trusted adults to anything they are uncomfortable with online."

Netflix's summary of the show says: "Hundreds of cash-strapped players accept a strange invitation to compete in children's games. Inside, a tempting prize awaits — with deadly high stakes."


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