'Magical' Southwold holidays inspire children's author's latest book

Emma Shevah with her new book, How to Save the World with a Chicken and and Egg, which is set in Southwold

Emma Shevah with her new book, How to Save the World with a Chicken and an Egg, which is set in Southwold - Credit: Natan Shevah

A children's author's experiences of holidaying in Southwold as a teenager have served as the basis for her latest book.

Emma Shevah, who grew up in south London, has written How to Save the World with a Chicken and an Egg, a mystery adventure set in the Suffolk coastal resort.

It tells the story of two youngsters who become friends, Ivy and Nathaniel, and touches upon themes of climate change, conservation and celebrating differences.

How to Save the World with a Chicken and and Egg, which is illustrated by Kirsti Beautyman, is Ms Shevah's fifth children's book.

As foreign travel options dwindle, more Brits will be holidaying in Suffolk this summer

The children's author set her book in the Suffolk resort due to her fond memories of holidays there - Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

Her previous efforts, such as Dream on Amber and Dara Palmer’s Major Drama, have received glowing reviews from the Independent, the Guardian and the Wall Street Journal.

Ms Shevah, who works as a head of year at Roedean School in Brighton, fondly remembers her time spent in Southwold and still has family in Suffolk.

She said she "felt so free" riding a bicycle through the resort during the summer and appreciated the change of environment from her home in the capital.

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Ms Shevah said: "The story is about a girl who lives in Southwold with an older couple who have fostered her. It's a fun story about friendship. All the bits about Southwold are very authentic.

"I grew up in London, but my mum lives in Wangford and my uncles both had houses up there.

"I always go down Southwold High Street when I visit - it hasn't changed a bit.

"The book is about climate change and how kids have been frustrated about how things are changing.

"Children feel powerless in the face of something huge and global like climate change. My aim is to inspire joy and show readers their role is important.

"Every summer I would spend on my bike all around Southwold. I have wanted to write a book about it for a long time as I thought it would be fun.

"Being on a bike in my teenage years in Southwold, I felt so free. It really was magical going there."

How to Save the World with a Chicken and an Egg, published by Chicken House, is out now.

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