‘It feels like your insides are being poured over with battery acid’ – Woman shares her endometriosis experience

Mozinah hopes her new book will help to inspire other women Picture: NEIL SMITH

Mozinah hopes her new book will help to inspire other women Picture: NEIL SMITH - Credit: Archant

A woman is preparing to share her experience of endometriosis, as she releases a book charting her life with the chronic condition.

Mozinah's conditions have had a large impact on her life Picture: NEIL SMITH

Mozinah's conditions have had a large impact on her life Picture: NEIL SMITH - Credit: Archant

Mozinah, 25, from Braintree has spent years searching for clarity about her condition.

She lives with endometriosis, a condition where tissue similar to the lining of the womb starts to grow in other places, like the ovaries and fallopian tubes.

Mozinah also has painful bladder syndrome, both conditions are classed as chronic illnesses.

"From the age of about 13 I was back and forth to my GP and gynaecologist with period and abdominal pain," said Mozinah.

Zoe Woods, Mel Cockett and Kathie Wylde will all take part in the book launch event Pictures: Zoe Wo

Zoe Woods, Mel Cockett and Kathie Wylde will all take part in the book launch event Pictures: Zoe Woods, Mel Cockett and Polly Alderton - Credit: Archant


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"They didn't know what it was. I was left feeling that these symptoms were normal."

Aged 17, Mozinah had an operation to try and improve her condition known as laser laparoscopy which removes some of the tissue.

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"I thought I was cured," said Mozinah.

"I felt fine but five or six months later my symptoms came back."

In 2016, she had another operation but surgeons said they could not find anything more.

"My urologist was not convinced, they think it's spread to my bladder," said Mozinah.

"Nothing cures endometriosis that's why its a chronic illness."

Misunderstandings

Mozinah believes there is a lot of misunderstanding around the condition, in part because it is still seen as a taboo subject.

"People think it's just a bad period, I am telling you it's not," said Mozinah.

"With the pain I have I cannot get out of bed with my period. It feels like your insides are being poured over with battery acid.

"The pain of endometriosis. It's not just stuck to your period. It's there for three weeks of the month."

The pain Mozinah experiences can come from a number of triggers.

"Stress can trigger it, ovulation is painful and heavy lifting can be triggering," said Mozinah.

"You feel very lonely and feel you have no-one to turn to.

"It's a very overwhelming, debilitating illness."

The pain has also caused her problems when it comes to getting jobs.

"I think there needs to be more support and understanding from employers," said Mozinah

"One in ten women globally have this and that sounds like a common thing but it doesn't mean it's not serious."

What are the symptoms of endometriosis?

According to the NHS the symptoms of endometriosis can vary greatly.

Some of the main symptoms include:

- pain in your lower tummy or back (pelvic pain) - usually worse during your period

- period pain that stops you doing your normal activities

- pain during or after sex

- pain when peeing or pooing during your period

- feeling sick, constipation, diarrhoea, or blood in your pee during your period

- difficulty getting pregnant

- heavy periods

Supporting others

Mozinah believes there should be more support for people with her condition and has started looking at ways to help support people like her.

"I have set up a Facebook group called EndoEssex," said Mozinah.

"We are not medical experts but we have been through it."

In April, Mozinah will also be releasing a book about her experiences with the condition in the hope that it will help others.

The book is called Endowitchiosis.

"It's my personal account of my last 12 years," said Mozinah.

"I think it will serve as a guide."

The book launch will take place at Braintree Holistic Centre on April 26 between 12pm and 3pm.

Mozinah will be joined at the launch by masseuse Zoe Woods, medical herbalist Kathie Wylde, and wild woman advocate Mel Cockett.

More information about the event and the book can be found on Mozinah's website.

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