Event to raise mental health awareness to take place in Bury

Robert Everitt, West Suffolk Council's cabinet member for families and communities poses for his own

Robert Everitt, West Suffolk Council's cabinet member for families and communities poses for his own scream, to highlight mental health awareness. He is pictured with Sasha and Jordanna Campbell of Fine Not Fine Picture: WEST SUFFOLK COUNCIL - Credit: Archant

Young people will be invited to express their own thoughts and feelings through art at a special event in Bury St Edmunds to raise awareness of mental health issues.

Sasha Campbell with mum Jordanna. The pair founded the Fine Not Fine campaign Picture: MARIAM GHAEMI

Sasha Campbell with mum Jordanna. The pair founded the Fine Not Fine campaign Picture: MARIAM GHAEMI - Credit: MARIAM GHAEMIt

The Fine Not Fine campaign is working with West Suffolk Council and Bury's market traders to raise awareness of mental health issues through The Big Scream event.

The event, which is taking place on Saturday on Bury St Edmunds market, will see local artists in the town reinterpreting Edvard Munich's iconic painting The Scream while people will also be able to pose for their own scream.

MORE: 'I felt imprisoned by my anxieties' - teenager battles to rebuild life after mental health unitsJordanna Campbell, who founded Fine Not Fine following her daughter Sasha's battle with mental health issues, said: "While any one of us is vulnerable to poor mental health in our lifetimes irrespective of how clever, talented or well off they seem, many of the early warning signs start while people are young.

"That's why Fine Not Fine was set up to encourage us all to start talking about mental health and to help people recognise the early signs of failing mental health.

Sasha and her mum Jordann Picture: SUPPLIED BY FAMILY

Sasha and her mum Jordann Picture: SUPPLIED BY FAMILY - Credit: SUPPLIED BY FAMILY

"We want young people to feel able to speak up when they see these early warning signs such as changing behaviour, their friends suddenly withdrawing or starting to wear long sleeved clothes all the time which could be hiding evidence of self-harming.


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"It's vital that we spot those early signs so that early intervention can happen before a condition escalates into something more serious."

MORE: 'I started thinking I would rather die than fail exams' - teenager speaks about mental healthRobert Everitt, West Suffolk Council's cabinet member for families and communities, said: "Mental health needs to start to get the recognition it deserves.

"West Suffolk Council is committed to raising awareness and has trained 12 mental health first aiders to give them the skills and confidence to spot some of the tell tale signs for common mental health issues and have those conversations, listening without judgement and encouraging people to speak freely.

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"Our aim is to work with Fine Not Fine to raise awareness of this important issue and help people recognise before their mental health, or the health of a sibling or friend reaches crises point.

"Our market is a focal point in the town where we can encourage young people to express themselves through art and start to have some of those conversations that are crucial to helping people's mental health."

For more on the Fine Not Fine campaign, click here.

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