Felixstowe Academy challenges English and maths results after disappointment on GCSE results day

Nancy Barnsley, Tiegan Fielding and Emily White celebrate their GCSE grades at Felixstowe Academy.

Nancy Barnsley, Tiegan Fielding and Emily White celebrate their GCSE grades at Felixstowe Academy. - Credit: Archant

Felixstowe Academy is not releasing its results statistics until after nearly 70 students have exam papers re-marked.

Nikita Pond, Matthew Varley and Callum Burrows with their GCSE results at Felixstowe Academy.

Nikita Pond, Matthew Varley and Callum Burrows with their GCSE results at Felixstowe Academy. - Credit: Archant

Andrew Salter, principal of Felixstowe Academy, said along with many schools and academies nationally this year, the variation in grade boundary changes had meant that for some students the results, particularly in English and Maths, are short of what was expected.

The academy has immediately put into place the process for challenging the grades for 69 students, 25% of the year group, to secure the grades the academy believes students expect and deserve.

Mr Salter said: “We successfully challenged a large number of English grades in 2014 that we felt were wrong.

“Our decision was proven to be correct with the outcomes benefitting individual students and the overall performance of the academy.

Felixstowe Academy students with their GCSE results.

Felixstowe Academy students with their GCSE results. - Credit: Archant


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“We are confident that a similar challenge this year will result in improvements for individual student successes and overall academy results truly reflecting all the hard work and effort that our students and staff have put in to the examinations this year.”

The school in Walton High Street was still delighted with the success of its students.

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Mr Salter said: “I am absolutely delighted to see so many of our students celebrating the outstanding success across so many GCSE subjects that will enable them to pursue further studies or apprenticeships.”

The academy saw an increase in the number of students achieving the A* to C grade in maths compared with last year, with 35% of students achieving the highest A*/A grades. Results in biology, chemistry and physics were also being celebrated with 89% of students achieving A* to C grades, and in history more than half of students secured A* to B grades.

Kerri Cheung, Bethanie Hurry, Amelia Sills and Ellie Haste with their GCSE results at Felixstowe Aca

Kerri Cheung, Bethanie Hurry, Amelia Sills and Ellie Haste with their GCSE results at Felixstowe Academy. - Credit: Archant

Opening their results together were Joshua Smith, Nancy Barnsley and Ollie Rose. Joshua, who was celebrating securing nine A* GCSE grades as well as an A grade in additional maths, said: “I hadn’t really thought about my results until today, and then I suddenly felt nervous about the results.

“Then we all arrived, had our envelopes in our hand then it was over in a flash! It feels great to know I have these results.”

Nancy, who achieved three A* grades in English language, English literature and history alongside four additional A grades, said: “I really enjoyed the whole of Year 11, but you need to pace yourself to get the most out of it. Start on a revision plan in good time and factor in breaks. There is a lot of work but if you give yourself time you will feel good throughout the year - and on results day!”

Ollie was “relieved” when he discovered he had achieved four A* grades in physics, chemistry, English language and maths alongside A and B grades. He said: “If you push yourself you can achieve everything you set out to achieve. The year goes quickly so the sooner you start with revision the better you will feel as you approach the exams.”

Nikita Pond, celebrating seven A* grades and an A GCSE grade alongside an A grade in additional maths, said: “It was a full on year but I enjoyed it. I hadn’t really thought about the results until last week and then today it was great to see these grades in sciences and maths.”

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