Fight to save the house that time forgot

By Benedict O'ConnorCONSERVATIONISTS are objecting to a plan to demolish East Anglia's "house that time forgot". When 21 Court Street in Nayland came onto the property market in 2002, it had remained largely untouched for more than 50 years, and successive owners failed in their attempts to modernise the part-18th century home.

By Benedict O'Connor

CONSERVATIONISTS are objecting to a plan to demolish East Anglia's "house that time forgot".

When 21 Court Street in Nayland came onto the property market in 2002, it had remained largely untouched for more than 50 years, and successive owners failed in their attempts to modernise the part-18th century home.

But Christopher Long-Price was granted planning permission to refurbish and extend the house, but sold it on to its third owner in three years, David Kemble.


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He has now lodged a planning application with Babergh District Council to knock the house down altogether and build a replacement.

Richard Ward, director of Suffolk Preservation Society, has now written to Babergh District Council to try to save the building, which is in Nayland's conservation area.

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"It would be the worst-case scenario if he council was to allow demolition of the existing building, only then to sanction what we feel is this poor replica," he added.

"This would not be true conservation, but an approach to conversation which is discredited and is only used now by theme parks and similar attractions.

"The council should be under no illusions of the considerable harm that should be done to its reputation if it was to allow this proposal on the basis that it is a credible approach to conservation and to this part of the Nayland conservation area."

Andora Carver, secretary of the Nayland with Wissington Conservation Society was equally opposed to the latest plan.

"We support the Suffolk Preservation Society's views. It's a very sad situation as the building has been subject to demolition applications three times," she said.

"It's one of the only examples of the evolution of a building through industrial times in the village as it was a builder's yard and it is in an important part of the conservation area.

"It's sad to see it in this state - it has been neglected and will cost a lot to put right, but it cannot be replaced and a new building would not fit in."

Former owner Mr Long-Price said the three-bedroom house was in a poor state of repair and had lain empty for the best part of the three years since it first came on the market.

He felt demolition was a realistic option for the building, which he did not consider to be of any architectural significance. Mr Kemble could not be contacted for comment at the weekend.

The latest planning application is likely to be decided by the council's planning control committee on February 23.

benedict.o'connor@eadt.co.uk

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