Flood defence scheme is unveiled

VILLAGERS are being asked for their views on the future strategy for flood defences on part of the Suffolk coast.Following consultation with groups representing local people and the wildlife of the area, the Environment Agency has identified a preferred option for managing flood risks between Dunwich and Walberswick.

VILLAGERS are being asked for their views on the future strategy for flood defences on part of the Suffolk coast.

Following consultation with groups representing local people and the wildlife of the area, the Environment Agency has identified a preferred option for managing flood risks between Dunwich and Walberswick.

To protect the freshwater habitats, as part of the agency's legal obligations, it intends to build and raise various banks on Dingle Marshes.

It will also recreate and replace the habitat that will and has been lost there from elsewhere.


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The agency has also suggested building a new earth embankment immediately at the back of the houses on St James' Street in Dunwich, which are most at risk from flooding.

This, however, would be subject to national funding, which would be up against other national projects and will depend on national priorities for flood defence funding.

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The preferred option will be displayed at a public exhibition next week.

A spokesperson said for the agency said: “We want to listen to people's views on the preferred option and would like as much feedback as possible to inform the final design of the preferred option.”

Robin Buncombe, Walberswick parish councillor, said: “This consultation exercise is important for the movement of our case but we think there's a bigger issue for the long term protection of Dunwich and think their consultation is incomplete.”

The agency's previous method of protecting this area of coastline has been to repair the shingle ridge, using bulldozers, each time it was breached.

This has proven expensive, ineffective and unsustainable. When the sea defences were breached by a North Sea surge at the end of last year, they were repaired by the agency at a cost of £20,000.

These breaches occurred only weeks after the agency spent £23,000 on bolstering defences on the same stretch of coast.

The public exhibition will take place from 2pm to 8pm at the Dunwich Reading Room on Monday, March 19.

kate.scotter@eadt.co.uk

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