From saddle to bike seat driver

By James HoreA COURAGEOUS horse-riding instructor is set to swap the saddle for a seat with a daredevil motorcycle team.When Kerri Cameron decided upon a career change, the 20-year-old looked at job opportunities on the internet and found one with the famous Wall of Death.

By James Hore

A COURAGEOUS horse-riding instructor is set to swap the saddle for a seat with a daredevil motorcycle team.

When Kerri Cameron decided upon a career change, the 20-year-old looked at job opportunities on the internet and found one with the famous Wall of Death.

But instead of the usual interview questions Miss Cameron, from Colchester, rode as a pillion passenger around the intimidating 20ft attraction and was given the green light to start her new job.

It was an impressive achievement for the youngster, from Centurion Way - because she had never even ridden a motorbike before.

However, she put her success down to a sense of balance gained from her work as a riding instructor with the Colchester Garrison Saddle Club.

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Her first show is next month but she will shortly start her career on the back of a vintage 1920's Indian motorcycle as she endures five to six weeks of intensive training.

Miss Cameron said her friends had been shocked to hear about her new direction.

“I did not know how to ride a motorbike, but knew they were after a young lady to replace one of their crew,” she added.

“I thought it would be interesting and went up and was given the chance to go round on the back of one of the team's bikes.

“At first my friends thought I was stupid to do it but they are now saying good luck to me.”

Despite risking life and limb, Miss Cameron's pay only starts at about £130 a week for the death-defying work.

Her new boss, Ken Fox, warned that it was hard work for little pay, but said it could be the experience of a lifetime.

And he added that her lack of experience on a motorbike would be to her advantage, allowing her to be moulded into the perfect Wall of Death rider.

Mr Fox said: “We live and work as a very close tight knit team.

“If somebody comes along and we can see they are not going to be part of that, they will be no good.

“It is dangerous, hard work for very little financial pay, but we do this because it is something which clicks inside you and if not, you give it up and go and work for Tesco.”

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