Gallery: New Suffolk Punch foals boost breed

THEY are the icon of our county, a feature of our countryside heritage and now two more youngsters are frolicking in the fields at the Suffolk Punch Trust, helping to secure the future of the rare breed.

Lizzie Parry

THEY are the icon of our county, a feature of our countryside heritage and now two more youngsters are frolicking in the fields at the Suffolk Punch Trust, helping to secure the future of the rare breed.

The filly foals join Colony Vee, born earlier this year, as the latest editions to the growing numbers at the Hollesley Bay Colony Stud.

Deeanne was born on April 15 and is the daughter of visiting mare Imogen, from Ireland.


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And the most recent addition, who is yet to be named, was born to Colony Polly on April 17.

All three foals born this year have been sired by resident stallions at the colony.

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Bruce Smith, head stud groom at the Suffolk Punch Trust, said the youngsters will hopefully help secure the survival of the breed.

“It is very satisfying to breed healthy Suffolk Punch foals,” he said. “And hopefully these young fillies will prove to be good breeding mares and help add to breed numbers in the future.”

And Deeanne and her new playmate are unlikely to be the last foals of the year, a spokesman at the stud said. They still have several mares in foal, but said he would not say how many so as not to tempt fate.

The Suffolk Punch is one of the oldest breed of working horse in the world and has the longest written pedigree of any breed.

There are only around 400 horses world wide and they are on the endangered list of the Rare Breeds Survival Trust.

Every Suffolk can be traced back to a stallion, known as Crisp's Horse of Ufford foaled in 1768.

Although now considered a rare breed, the Suffolk Punch is still recognised as an icon for the county, and one of the most important features of our countryside heritage.

They owe their existence to just a handful of owners and breeders, with the Colony Stud at Hollesley Bay crucial to the preservation of the breed.

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