Keep your eyes on the skies - More chances to spot the International Space Station

Captured over Ipswich, the International Space Station passing overhead Picture: PEREGRINE BUSH

Captured over Ipswich, the International Space Station passing overhead Picture: PEREGRINE BUSH - Credit: PEREGRINE BUSH

Missed seeing the International Space Station (ISS) over Suffolk this weekend? You’re not too late, as there will be many more chances to see it this month.

A shot of the International Space Station over Ipswich Picture: PHILIP PROCTER

A shot of the International Space Station over Ipswich Picture: PHILIP PROCTER - Credit: Philip Procter

Take a look at these reader photos to get an impression of what you will be looking out for in the night sky.

A slow-motion shot showing the space station over Ipswich, taken using the NightCap app Picture: PHI

A slow-motion shot showing the space station over Ipswich, taken using the NightCap app Picture: PHILIP PROCTER - Credit: PHILIP PROCTER

Peregrine Bush and Mark Power both took photos of it passing over the Ipswich area.

The International Space Station passing the Plough over Nacton Picture: MARK POWER

The International Space Station passing the Plough over Nacton Picture: MARK POWER - Credit: MARK POWER

And Philip Procter took photos of the space station over Ipswich over two nights, in slow motion, using the NightCap app.

A shot of the International Space Station over Ipswich Picture: PHILIP PROCTER

A shot of the International Space Station over Ipswich Picture: PHILIP PROCTER - Credit: Philip Procter

The station, which has a six-person crew, constantly travels 200 miles above our heads - and can occasionally be seen when its orbit passes overhead.

You may be able to see the International Space Station above Suffolk over the coming nights. Picture

You may be able to see the International Space Station above Suffolk over the coming nights. Picture: NASA - Credit: NASA


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It looks like a bright star, appearing in the west and travelling south-southeast for a few minutes. If you don’t have binoculars you could also be able to spot it with the naked eye.

Suffolk astronomer Neil Norman said: “People love the station and a good pair of binoculars will show some detail of the space craft.

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“Luckily for us, the station is passing over us every night until May 26, and there will be some very bright passes.

“The highest times are when it is best placed, but it can be seen two minutes before the stated time, and people can follow it as it traverses the sky.”

Neil said the best times to see the ISS over the coming nights, when it will be very bright, are:

May 18: 10.07pm, magnitude -3.8; 11.43pm, magnitude -3.9.

May 19: 1.20am, magnitude -3.9; 10.56pm, magnitude -3.8.

May 20: 12.32am, magnitude -3.9; 10.08pm, magnitude -3.8; 11.45pm, magnitude -3.8.

May 21: 10.57pm, magnitude -3.7.

May 22: 12.33am, magnitude -3.5; 10.09pm, magnitude -3.7; 23.46, magnitude-3.9.

May 23: 10.58pm, magnitude -3.9.

May 24: 11.47pm, magnitude -3.3.

May 25: 10.59pm, magnitude -3.6.

May 26: 10.11pm, magnitude -3.8.

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