Group set up to tackle road death toll

A WORKING party is being set up in a bid to cut the number of young people in Essex involved in car accidents.A study commissioned by Essex County Council found that young people aged between 17 to 25 are involved in a third of all injury accidents.

A WORKING party is being set up in a bid to cut the number of young people in Essex involved in car accidents.

A study commissioned by Essex County Council found that young people aged between 17 to 25 are involved in a third of all injury accidents.

Accidents involving this age group tend to take place at night and excessive speed is often a contributory factor. The young drivers are found to be at fault in 80% of the accidents.

The council already sends out an information pack to every17-year-old in the county containing useful information for the young person and their parent at a time when the issue of driving is most pertinent.


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Secondary schools in Essex also have the chance to take part in a pre-driver education initiative provided by the county council. It is called BSM Ignition and includes teacher training and a teaching pack.

Now a driving working group is being launched to try to improve the accident record of young drivers. The inaugural meeting is on November 12. It will be followed by a seminar to get the message across to a wider audience.

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Nationally a Pass Plus scheme has been introduced to give extra experience in specific areas of motoring, such as night-time or motorway driving, which a learner-driver does not get while practising for their driving licence.

This summer, Essex Police made a plea to young drivers to take more care, following a spate of tragic accidents in which young people died. So far almost a quarter of people killed on the roads in the county this year have been aged 21 or under.

A police spokesman blamed inexperience – not being familiar with the vehicle or road layout.

The AA is advocating a young driver's code saying what is expected of them, asking them to think before driving a powerful car, carrying many passengers or driving in the early hours.

If police spotted a driver committing an offence in contravention of the code, they could refer the matter to court instead of issuing a fixed penalty notice.

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