Head quits with attack on Government

A VILLAGE school headmaster described by Ofsted as having "outstanding educational vision" yesterday launched an attack on “Nanny State Britain” as he quit his job in protest at Government interference.

A VILLAGE school headmaster described by Ofsted as having "outstanding educational vision" yesterday launched an attack on “Nanny State Britain” as he quit his job in protest at Government interference.

Peter Brackley, who has been running schools for 28 years, said he had simply had enough despite achieving glowing Ofsted inspection reports.

However, the Government insists it has slashed the bureaucratic burden on headteachers and brought about changes to promote leadership.

The 58-year-old headteacher of Tendring Primary School, near Clacton, said: "I have grown increasingly frustrated by the constant avalanche of central government policies, many of which are ill-conceived and inadequately resourced.


You may also want to watch:


“Sadly education suffers from too much interference and not enough trust. With central government producing raft after raft of strategies, it deflects from the school's own agenda.”

Mr Brackley added: "It is clearly a genuine wrench to leave a such a happy and successful school, one in which I have had the opportunity to work with so many talented staff and enthusiastic pupils.

Most Read

"Ofsted said that ours was a happy and ambitious school which provided a high quality of education for all its pupils and, for once, I would agree with their comments."

Mr Brackley took over the headship of the 113-pupil primary school in 1991 but before that he had worked as either a head or deputy head for 13 years.

But he said during that time he had got fed up with constant government initiatives which he was expected to implement with little or no cash.

One such initiative which has angered him is the ruling that teachers must have time out of the classroom to keep on top of burgeoning paperwork.

"It is a good thing but there has been no provision made to allow heads to continue delivering high quality education at such times.

"Some schools are leaving teaching assistants in charge, which the Government is happy with, but we have decided we want qualified teachers in the classroom at all times and it is very difficult to achieve."

Mr Brackley said the Government also seemed oblivious to the fact that a village primary school is different from an inner city school.

"They have a one-size fits all approach. They have models which they feel are effective but they don't work in all schools."

Even Ofsted could do nothing but praise Mr Brackley in its most recent report which described the school as "happy, ambitious and very effective."

The report also singled out Mr Brackley and said one of its main strengths was: "The outstanding educational vision of the headteacher and his skills in teambuilding are central to the very good quality of education provided by the school."

Yesterday, a spokesman for the Department for Education and Skills said: “No Government has done more to both recruit and support heads because we recognise the challenges and responsibility that the job brings.

“We have increased pay to reward heads for the job they do, introduced key reforms to help them manage workloads better, slashed the bureaucratic burden on them and brought about changes to promote leadership so they have the skills needed.”

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus