Over half of Suffolk people susceptible to mental health problems

The vaccination rate for 12 to 15-year-olds is almost 10% lower than the national average in areas o

The research shows that over half of people in Suffolk are now susceptible to stress and mental health issues. - Credit: PA

A study has shown that more than half of people in Suffolk are now susceptible to stress and mental health problems.

Mental health charity Suffolk Mind has revealed that the number of people who are at risk of facing mental health struggles has more than doubled since the first lockdown two years ago.

Today (March 23) marks two years to the day that Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced the UK's first full lockdown.

The study shows that the percentage of people susceptible to stress and ill mental health in Suffolk was 24% prior to the first lockdown, but has now soared to 55%.

Chief executive officer of Suffolk Mind, Jon Neal, said: “It has been a trying time for everyone during the coronavirus pandemic and subsequent lockdowns, and the county’s mental health has taken a hit as a result.

“Although Covid-19 restrictions were necessary to stop the spread of the virus, it has had a huge impact on people’s lives and how we all meet our emotional needs.

“It is crucial, with restrictions lifted and life somewhat returning to normal, that we focus on how we get our emotional needs met now, and look out for people around us who might be struggling.”

Jon Neal, chief executive of Suffolk Mind, has called for greater education to tackle mental health

Chief executive officer of Suffolk Mind, Jon Neal. - Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

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According to the charity's research people out of work and younger people were more likely to be experiencing stress or mental health issues over the last two years.

Suffolk Mind has identified 12 physical and emotional needs that if are not satisfied, leave people susceptible to stress and ill mental health.

These are, attention, control, emotional connection, respect, food and drink, achievement, sleep, security, community, meaning and purpose, privacy and movement.

The research showed that people aged between 18-24 experienced the biggest drop in how well their emotional needs were met, with the biggest decreases in security, meaning and purpose.

Young people were also more likely to be furloughed as well as have their education disrupted over the last two years.

For more information about Suffolk Mind and the services they offer you can do so on the charity's website.