Heatwave ‘30 times more likely’ due to climate change

A drone's eye view of crop fields on the Euston Estate around the Breckland swales, which suffered b

A drone's eye view of crop fields on the Euston Estate around the Breckland swales, which suffered because of the heatwave this summer Picture: PETE MATSELL - Credit: Archant

More risk of record-breaking temperatures due to carbon emissions

Climate change made this year’s summer heatwave around 30 times more likely than it would be under natural conditions, the Met Office has said.

This summer was the equal warmest in a series dating back to 1910, along with 2006, 2003 and 1976, with temperatures reaching a peak on July 27 when 35.6C (96F) was recorded at Felsham, Suffolk. The hot and dry weather hit the region’s farmers and caused stress to wildlife.

New analysis from the Met Office has found that the record-breaking summer temperatures were about 30 times more likely as a result of climate change caused by human activities.

The UK now has around a 12% chance of summer average temperatures being as high as they were in 2018, whereas they would have less than 0.5% chance of happening in a “natural” climate, the Met Office said.


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