Hospitals winning the MRSA fight

HOSPITALS in Suffolk are among a handful in the region expected to beat their target for cutting MRSA infections this year, it has been revealed.Both Ipswich and West Suffolk Hospital recorded fewer MRSA positive tests between April last year and February than their imposed limit - and each is expected to remain below the target once March data is analysed.

By Danielle Nuttall

HOSPITALS in Suffolk are among a handful in the region expected to beat their target for cutting MRSA infections this year, it has been revealed.

Both Ipswich and West Suffolk Hospital recorded fewer MRSA positive tests between April last year and February than their imposed limit - and each is expected to remain below the target once March data is analysed.

The figures were revealed in a progress report to the Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridgeshire Strategic Health Authority.


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It shows Ipswich Hospital recorded 40 MRSA positive blood tests between April and February compared to its annual limit of 42, while West Suffolk Hospital reported 27 compared to a maximum limit of 37.

The James Paget Hospital in Gorleston, Norfolk, and the Norfolk and Norwich Hospital both exceeded the rate.

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The report notes despite the Norfolk and Norwich Hospital not meeting its ceiling level, it had still managed to reduce MRSA cases by more than 15%.

Jan Rowsell, Ipswich Hospital spokeswoman, said: “The reduction is thanks to the public support in helping us combat the spread of infections including MRSA. We very much welcome this very positive news but the last thing we would want to be is complacent. We know we have a way to go to achieve the 60% reduction rate by 2008.

“We have had a very high profile 'Clean Your Hands' campaign led by modern matrons involving large banners and posters throughout the hospital and alcohol dispensers at the beginning of each ward and at the bedsides, encouraging people to wash their hands.

“We have an MRSA free ward which means people are tested before they come in. If they have it they go to a different ward.

“A great deal has gone on in terms of awareness and encouraging people not to come and visit if they do not feel well. It's been a continuation of what we started before but it's very a very active campaign.

“We intend to do even more in the coming months and years.”

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