Housing scheme branded a 'carbuncle'

A MULTI-million pound housing scheme which will force a rugby club from its traditional home has been described as a "monstrosity" and "carbuncle" by protestors who lost their battle to block the build.

A MULTI-million pound housing scheme which will force a rugby club from its traditional home has been described as a "monstrosity" and "carbuncle" by protestors who lost their battle to block the build.

The go-ahead for 306 homes on an 18.5 hectare plot in Rugby Road, Great Cornard, was greeted with disappointment yesterdayby campaigners, who say the village's existing infrastructure cannot cope with a population increase of 1,400.

The decision, made during a meeting of Babergh District Council's planning committee, will force the relocation of Sudbury Rugby Club from its current headquarters to Blackhouse Lane. A new clubhouse, two new pitches and a possible all-weather track will be built as a result.

During yesterday's meeting, Humphrey Todd, who represents the village on the district council, expressed fears the infrastructure of Great Cornard would be unable to cope with the size of the build.


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"This is likely to be a monstrosity – a carbuncle bolted onto the end of the village," he told the meeting. "The size is too large. It is bigger than was envisaged in the Local Plan and has become one of those schemes that, every time you blinked, it grew in numbers."

He added the existing road network would struggle to cater for the extra traffic generated by the new housing, with the development putting extra pressure on schools and doctors.

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And Peter Beer, who led the fight for the development to be thrown out, launched a scathing attack on highways bosses at Suffolk County Council, who carried out a traffic survey in the village in the run-up to the meeting.

"We are constantly told that there is no traffic problem in Great Cornard by the highways authority, but any resident of the village could point it out," he said.

"The authority is out of touch with local people and needs to take a visit to planet Earth."

Speaking after the meeting, Mr Beer slammed members for making the "wrong decision."

"The fact that this will increase Great Cornard's population by 1,400 people, without sufficient improvements being made to the existing infrastructure, will only store up problems for the future," he said.

The development, masterminded by Persimmon Homes, will see 107 affordable housing units built as part of the project. It is thought work will begin on site within the next two months.

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