Revealed: Cheapest and most expensive places to buy homes in Suffolk

Explore the beautiful medieval town of Lavenham Picture: Getty Images/iStockphoto

Lavenham and other Babergh villages are among some of the most expensive places to live in Suffolk - Credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto

The 'green migration' is seeing people move out of London to leafy Suffolk - fuelled by lockdown and the acceleration of home working - and prices are rising but house hunters can still pick up a bargain if they know where to look.

Here we look at where the cheapest and most expensive places are to live in Suffolk.

Cheapest locations - Lowestoft and Felixstowe

It is a well known fact that one of the cheapest places to buy a property in Suffolk is the coastal town of Lowestoft on the border with Norfolk.

A search on Rightmove reveals the lowest priced home in the county is a one-bedroom apartment up for auction in London Road South, offering bedroom, bathroom and kitchen area for just £42,000.

One independent Lowestoft estate agent the town has always been outpriced by the more popular east coast locations such as Southwold, which is one of the most expensive places to live in the county.

Lowestoft has the very cheapest homes in Suffolk, in part due to its isolation and lack of jobs

Lowestoft has the very cheapest homes in Suffolk, in part due to its isolation and lack of jobs - Credit: CHPV

They added: "We have our own train station but it's a long commute to London, it's quite isolated too so there are limited jobs — the overvaluing of properties can be an issue in the area." 

While the first few pages of cheaper listings are all in Lowestoft, excluding retirement village homes, the next cheapest is in Felixstowe, where you can purchase a one-bedroom flat in Ranelagh Road for £114,950.


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Most expensive locations - Southwold, Woodbridge, Aldeburgh and Orford 

Tim Dansie, of Jackson Stops sells some of the most expensive homes Suffolk has to offer and says the worth of homes in Babergh is rising even further following the mass exodus to the country.

Tim Dansie of Jackson Stops sells some of the most expensive homes in Suffolk

Tim Dansie of Jackson Stops sells some of the most expensive homes in the county, which generally lie in Babergh or East Suffolk - Credit: Gregg Brown

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He said: "Woodbridge, Southwold, Aldeburgh, Orford are highly priced, they have always been that way and will continue to be.

"There are only so many properties with views across the estuaries or beaches and in Babergh there's the lure of being close to the A12 and a mainline station at Manningtree."

The most expensive home on the market in Suffolk is currently Hill Farm in Martlesham, up for £7.5million, with  224 acres of organic farmland overlooking the River Deben.

The 18th century farmhouse and pool at Hill Farm, Martlesham, on the market for £7.5million

The 18th century farmhouse and pool at Hill Farm, Martlesham, on the market for £7.5million - Credit: Chris Rawlings

A six-bedroom home in Southwold is up for £3million and a five-bedroom home on Aldeburgh High Street for £1,950,000.

Mr Dansie said the "green migration" from London is now pushing up prices in mid and north Suffolk to places such as Stowmarket, whereas properties there have previously been cheaper.

Range of options - Ipswich

Though areas such as the east coast and Babergh have been identified as pricey spots for homes, Ipswich has continued to have a range of options.

Matthew Jaques, area manager for Haarts Estate Agents in Ipswich, said the areas with former local authority housing such as Chantry and Whitton continue to be the cheapest, while properties in Kesgrave and Rushmere are more expensive.

"There are 10 buyers for every home in the IP5 postcode at the moment," he said. "Properties are selling for on average £15,000 more than their asking price.

"Some people are sitting on the fence still but there's a little bit of a panic as prices have shot up, more people are moving to Ipswich as businesses move out of cities and more back to their roots."

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