Human bones could be 1,000 years old

HUMAN remains unearthed in a village once dubbed the world's most haunted could date back around 1,000 years, it has been revealed.The legendary hauntings of Borley, on the Suffolk/Essex border, took a new twist when workman recently found part of a skull, ribs and leg bones, just outside the boundaries of the village churchyard.

HUMAN remains unearthed in a village once dubbed the world's most haunted could date back around 1,000 years, it has been revealed.

The legendary hauntings of Borley, on the Suffolk/Essex border, took a new twist when workman recently found part of a skull, ribs and leg bones, just outside the boundaries of the village churchyard.

Experts immediately suggested the remains could have been those of a witch or non-believer, who were buried in disgrace outside the church boundaries.

Other locals even feared the bones had a more sinister origin. They were worried they may be connected to the notorious Kray twins, whose London crime empire reigned supreme in the 1960s.


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It is reported the gangsters had a caravan in the parish around 40 years ago and stayed there on numerous occasions. Some believe Ronnie Kray hid there when wanted for questioning by police in the capital.

But both theories have now been dismissed after tests on the bones revealed they date from between the 11th and 13th Century.

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The investigations also revealed the remains were those of a middle-aged man and a youth, buried near each other.

Contractors converting a 14th Century barn, close to the historic church, dug up the remains in February.

Essex police were called to the barn but a coroner ruled the bones were too old to warrant any further investigations.

Local ghost researcher Edward Babbs pushed for full-tests on the remains, believing the bones could have vital links to the legendary haunting.

The original Borley Rectory was once claimed to be the world's most haunted house and skull fragments from the 17th Century were found beneath it when it burned to the ground in 1939.

A Cambridge scientist agreed to examine the bones on behalf of the Essex coroner and discovered they dated back as far as the 11th Century.

Mr Babbs said: "It does now appear the latest discovery has no link with the haunting because they are so ancient. The point is we now know the truth."

Church rector Capt Brian Sampson said: "I was with the Essex coroner when the examination was carried out last week. The bones were from two separate graves, one of a youth around 17, and another of a middle-aged man. The boundaries of the churchyard used to extend around where the bones were found in the 14th Century, so there is nothing unusual about them. The bones will now be re-interned within the grounds of the current churchyard."

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