I still love son who tried to kill me

A MOTHER last nightspoke of her love for her son after he was sent to a secure hospital indefinitely for trying to kill her.June Newmansaid her son Clive, who suffers from schizophrenia, was “not in his normal mind” when he stabbed her three times at their Colchester home.

A MOTHER last nightspoke of her love for her son after he was sent to a secure hospital indefinitely for trying to kill her.

June Newmansaid her son Clive, who suffers from schizophrenia, was “not in his normal mind” when he stabbed her three times at their Colchester home.

Mr Newman, 34, was yesterdayfound not guilty of attempted murder by reason of insanity at Chelmsford Crown Court.

Judge Ben Pearson ordered that he be detained at a secure hospital for an unlimited period of time, saying he still presented a serious danger to the public.


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The jury was told Mr Newman believed he had to kill his mother to prove his belief in God and the attack was “something that had to be done.”

Three psychiatrists who assessed Mr Newman since the incident on January 21 last yeardiagnosed him as suffering from schizophrenia.

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He had suffered from mental health problems since 2000 as he reached the end of a four-year degree in psychology.

Speaking after the case, Mrs Newman, 62, said: “The verdict was what was necessary. I am glad he is going to get treatment in a hospital. He was not in his normal mind when it happened.

“He had been ill for quite a long time and that night something went beyond normal bounds.

“But you don't switch off love just because something like that happens.”

She added: “It has been a tough day. I have got a foot in both camps, so to speak.”

The court heard that Mrs Newman, a widow, and her son ate dinner together at the home they shared in Warwick Bailey Close, Colchester, on January 21 last year.

Mr Newman went upstairs, leaving his mother to watch television, but returned soon after with a pillow and a knife.

In a statement read to the jury Mrs Newman said he put the pillow on her face and was “obviously trying to suffocate me.”

She fought him but he told her: “I have got things to do and must not leave you here to suffer” before she felt three blows to her stomach.

Mrs Newman said she initially thought he had punched her but then she saw he had a knife and realised he had stabbed her.

“I realised he wanted me to die and he meant to kill me. He thought he was being kind to me by killing me,” her statement read.

“I thought he had intended to kill himself and for whatever reason thought it was best if I died before.”

As Mrs Newman felt herself getting weaker due to blood loss she told her son to let her die in peace and he went back to his bedroom.

As she attempted to leave the house she heard him walking downstairs and pretended to be unconscious in the chair as he stood over her.

Mr Newman then left his mother to return to his room and she was able to leave the house and go to a neighbour's home for help.

She underwent emergency surgery at Colchester General Hospital to repair damage to her stomach and bowel.

Mr Newman was arrested soon afterwards and admitted the attack, saying he had to prove himself to God.

The court heard he had been unwell for some years and had previously set off naked to Ardleigh Reservoir to drown himself, before being stopped en route by police, and had also believed he was Jesus and could walk on water.

He had been admitted to the Lakes psychiatric hospital in Colchester on a number of occasions.

At the time of the attack it was said he believed his mother had been taken away by demonic forces and replaced by an impostor.

Judge Pearson paid tribute to Mrs Newman, saying: “I know you have been in court throughout and the description given to the doctor by your son was that you were a remarkable, resilient woman. You are indeed.

“You have had to show immense courage over the past year or so and you have proved you are an extraordinary lady.”

He said there was hope that at some stage in the future Mr Newman would be bought back to good health so family life could be resumed but the first priority was the danger he could present if released.

“I am sure you of all people understand that,” said Judge Pearson.

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