Inquiry begins to find who dumped 24 World War Two bombs weighing around 600lbs in total at recycling plant near Ipswich

Investigation in bomb find at Sackers recycling

Investigation in bomb find at Sackers recycling

An inquiry is under way after 24 World War Two practice bombs weighing around 600lbs in total were found at a Suffolk recycling centre.

Bomb disposal experts were called out twice on Wednesday afternoon to Sackers site in Great Blakenham near Ipswich.

Originally police said they had reports that around 10 devices had been discovered. However, yesterday a spokesman for Army said two dozen were eventually discovered among a consignment of scrap metal.

At least 23 of the devices were inactive, but the bomb squad from Colchester was unsure of the status of the final one.

It was moved to Sackers site in Needham Market yesterday when a controlled explosion took place.


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A spokeswoman for the Environment Agency, which investigates incidents at recycling centres, said it is now trying to trace the person or company which took the scrap metal to Great Blakenham.

The Army spokesman said: “A bomb disposal team from Colchester Troop, 621 Squadron, 11 EOD Regiment Royal Logistic Corps was called out to Sackers Recycling in Great Blakenham at 12.30pm on Wednesday 17 December.

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“Staff had raised the alarm after finding three suspected bombs among a consignment of scrap metal.

“On inspection, they were found to be inert Second World War-vintage 25lb practice bombs and recovered for safe disposal.

“The team were called back to the same address at 3pm after the discovery of a further 21 similar items.

“Of these, 20 were identified as inert Second World War-vintage 25lb practice bombs and recovered for safe disposal.

“One was too corroded and covered in mud for it to be clearly identified to establish if it contained any explosives.

“It was kept at the site overnight, before being moved to fields near the company’s premises at Ipswich Road, Needham Market and destroyed in a controlled explosion at 10.30am on Thursday 19 December.”

“Old ammunition can be quite unstable. We would encourage people to call 999 if they do have concerns about any suspect item they find.

“It is better to be safe than sorry.”

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