Orwell Green Garden Village plans for 2,700 homes will be ‘harmful’, objectors warn

CGI indicative images of the early proposals for the Orwell Green Garden Village development Picture

CGI indicative images of the early proposals for the Orwell Green Garden Village development Picture: GLADMAN - Credit: Gladman

Objectors to a garden village on the outskirts of Ipswich have warned that it will be “harmful” to the town if it goes ahead.

The red line shows the boundary of the proposed Orwell Green garden village development - bounded by

The red line shows the boundary of the proposed Orwell Green garden village development - bounded by the A12, Seven Hills interchange, A14, Straight Road, Woodhouse Road and Purdis Road Picture: GLADMAN DEVELOPMENTS - Credit: Archant

Gladman Developments lodged plans for a 2,700-home estate, called the Orwell Green Garden Village, on farmland next to the A14 and A12 at Seven Hills.

The project would also see two new schools, sports pitches, shops and play areas established across a 350 acre site.

East Suffolk Council does not have the land allocated in its local plan, prompting Ipswich Borough Council's planning committee, which is a statutory consultee, to vehemently reject the proposals.

Councillor Carole Jones, portfolio holder for planning and planning committee member, said: "This is not in their local plan, and I agree [East Suffolk Council] won't like it.

The masterplan for the Orwell Green development Picture: GLADMAN DEVELOPMENTS

The masterplan for the Orwell Green development Picture: GLADMAN DEVELOPMENTS - Credit: Archant


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"They don't want this here, we don't want this here and it will have a number of harmful effects on Ipswich."

Among the concerns were plans for a new roundabout on the A12 to access the site, which planners said was not suitable while there were already uncertainties about speed limit changes on that stretch of road from the Brightwell Lakes development in Martlesham.

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The council's report said: "The land in question is isolated from the surrounding key settlements and forms an attractive countryside setting around the Ipswich urban area which would be significantly harmed by inappropriate development in the countryside."

"The transport statement anticipates that there would be 18,243 daily trips by car or van. The additional vehicle movements would have a harmful impact on traffic and air quality inside and outside IBC," it added.

Carole Jones, planning portfolio-holder at Ipswich Borough Council, warned that it was an unwanted d

Carole Jones, planning portfolio-holder at Ipswich Borough Council, warned that it was an unwanted development. Picture: SU ANDERSON - Credit: Su Anderson

According to the council's report, East Suffolk Council can demonstrate a housing land supply of 9.3 years, which means it is not required to weigh more in favour of approving developments.

A four-week consultation began on June 5, with a determination period running until the middle of September.

Gladman said: "This proposal for a new garden village in East Suffolk is an effective way to deliver housing within an appropriate time frame and with a critical mass that will facilitate the delivery of infrastructure such as schools, health centres and transport improvements to the benefit of new and existing communities."

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