Ipswich cancer survivor to take on London Marathon in aid of charity that supported her through treatment

Faye said she wanted to give back to the charity which helped her so much. Picture: FAYE MOREY

Faye said she wanted to give back to the charity which helped her so much. Picture: FAYE MOREY - Credit: Archant

An inspirational Ipswich woman is set to run the London Marathon tomorrow in aid of the charity that supported her through her own cancer journey.

Faye Morey, 23, is running the Virgin Money London Marathon this Sunday for the 2018 Official Charit

Faye Morey, 23, is running the Virgin Money London Marathon this Sunday for the 2018 Official Charity Partner - Teenage Cancer Trust, the charity that supported her during her cancer journey. Picture: FAYE MOREY - Credit: Archant

23-year-old Faye Morey from Suffolk has set herself the challenge of conquering the 26-mile route in potentially record high temperatures to raise money for Teenage Cancer Trust – a charity that was there for her and her family when she was diagnosed with the disease aged 20.

Ms Morey was working as an insurance account handler in September 2015, when she decided to take a big risk and move to London to start a new job in the city.

But a month before she was due to go, she was diagnosed with stage 4 Hodgkin’s lymphoma and had to start chemotherapy.

Ms Morey was based at Addenbrookes Hospital on the Teenage Cancer Trust facility, where she said that being around people her own age was a relief.

Faye was diagnosed with cancer aged just 20. Picture: FAYE MOREY

Faye was diagnosed with cancer aged just 20. Picture: FAYE MOREY - Credit: Archant


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“It is all about being around other young people,” she said. “I used to go and get treatment every other week and I was surrounded by people over 60.”

Ms Morey said that, while having cancer is never going to be easy, the support from Teenage Cancer Trust was an enormous comfort – and now she is keen to show how much she appreciates their work.

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“I want to do something to give back to the charity,” Faye said.

“They were there for you whether you were at hospital or not. There was always someone to call.

“My parents had someone who they could speak to – it was good that they had that kind of external support.

“I have always enjoyed running – I used to run for the Ipswich Harriers. I started exercising during treatment and I started running afterwards.

“I thought it was a good way of raising money and doing something in support of the charity.”

Teenage Cancer Trust offers all kinds of support – from specialist nursing on the ward, to emotional help and organised activities to bring young people together.

Ms Morey said that she particularly enjoyed a trip to Go Ape, where she was able to build contacts with people like her.

“You can speak to another person who went through the same thing,” she said.

In September 2016, six months into remission, Ms Morey moved to London and started her dream course at Central St. Martins University studying Fashion History and Theory.

When asked how she felt about the big day, Ms Morey said she was apprehensive but ready for the challenge.

“I am obviously nervous and excited at the same time,” she said.

“My longest run was 21 miles. I feel prepared. I think it will be fun. I have got quite a strong support team.”

Now two years cancer-free, Ms Morey wants to thank those who helped her through her darkest times.

She said: “I’d like to give a shout out to Amy on the Addenbrooke’s Ward – one of the support workers.

“They are amazing. Everything they do is so positive. You can’t sum it up in words.”

Teenage Cancer Trust is the Official Charity of the Year for the Virgin Money London Marathon, taking place tomorrow, April 22.

The charity has over 700 people running as part of its own #TeamLegend.

Judith Anderson, Teenage Cancer Trust regional fundraiser, said: “The incredible support of people like Faye, undertaking challenges like the Virgin Money London Marathon, is invaluable. Without vital fundraising Teenage Cancer Trust wouldn’t be able to provide the specialised nursing and emotional support that young people with cancer aged 13-24 so desperately need.

“But right now, the charity doesn’t have enough nurses and can only support half of young people with cancer. The help of supporters through challenges like the marathon, are crucial to fund more Teenage Cancer Trust nurses. We wish Faye, and all of #TeamLegend the best of luck for Sunday!”

To sponsor Faye, go to her online fundraising page here.

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