Ipswich: Sally gives feathered friend second chance at life

Sally Wilson of Ipswich with the gull chick that she rescued from the town centre and is hand feedin

Sally Wilson of Ipswich with the gull chick that she rescued from the town centre and is hand feeding at home. She has named the chick Steven Seagull

HE may look cute and cuddly now, but this little fella has a lot of growing to do – and will turn in to one of the biggest and much-maligned birds of our skies.

Steven Seagull

Steven Seagull

For this is a baby gull and he has been given a second chance at life after being found wandering alone in Ipswich town centre.

Sally Wilson feeds the gull chick that she rescued from the town centre and is hand feeding at home.

Sally Wilson feeds the gull chick that she rescued from the town centre and is hand feeding at home.

The youngster was just a few days old and seemingly abandoned by his parents when Sally Wilson found him on the Cornhill at 1am in the morning.

Miss Wilson, 43, a police officer, scooped him up in her hat and found a box near the Golden Lion and took him home.

Now he is living in an old guinea pig hutch and growing fast.


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She said: “Normally I don’t interfere with birds or wildlife but I was just so afraid that some drunken idiot would stand on him or that he would be got by a cat.

“I put him in my hat and then in the box and brought him home. At least he didn’t end up being squashed – you hear about people standing on baby ducks for the fun of it.”

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The gull chick – which has been christened Steven after actor and musician Steven Seagal – has not been fazed by his new surroundings and has been tucking into regular meals of pilchards, sardines and cat food.

Miss Wilson said: “He is doing really well and I am keeping my fingers crossed that hopefully he will grow strong enough to be able to fly away and fend for himself, but I don’t know what the outcome will be yet.

“I was putting the food on a fork at first but now he scavenges for himself off the ground.

“He’s quite sweet. When I found him he had all feathery down but now his feathers are starting to change and I am sure it won’t be too long before he has proper ones. I think it will be about 35 days and then we will see what happens.

“When he gets too big for the guinea pig hutch I will move him into a bigger cage.

“I just couldn’t bear to think that he might have died and wanted to give him another chance at life.”

Have you helped a bird or animal in extreme circumstances? Tell us your story – write to Star Letters, Ipswich Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich IP4 1AN.

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