It's Suffolk pink for 'lilac house'

IT was all change for Janice Daines as her infamous lilac house finally became a unique shade of Suffolk pink.The landscape in Callis Street, Clare, changed yesterday as the Grade II listed cottage that Mrs Daines painted a vibrant shade of lilac without planning permission was toned down.

IT was all change for Janice Daines as her infamous lilac house finally became a unique shade of Suffolk pink.

The landscape in Callis Street, Clare, changed yesterday as the Grade II listed cottage that Mrs Daines painted a vibrant shade of lilac without planning permission was toned down.

With the help of traditional paint expert Ted Ingilby and specialist painter Troy Bentley-Walls, Mrs Daines watched as the lilac walls finally faded away under the new colour.

Despite the change of colour the house is still unique as the colour was made by Mr Ingilby at his Glemsford workshop and is called Daines' pink.

Mr Ingilby became involved after reading of her three-year battle with St Edmundsbury Borough Council.

He said: "This is a type of Suffolk pink, but is totally unique. It is a deeper flush than usual and Janice came to the workshop to decide exactly what colour she wanted. I like the colour and have decided to call it Daines' Pink. If people like it we could use it again."

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Mrs Daines put St Edmundsbury officials in a flutter when she painted her house lilac three years ago.

The authority ruled it was not a suitable colour for the historic area – with some councillors likened it to "teletubby land" and "pantomime scenery."

The single mother-of-two backed down after a lengthy legal wrangle with the authority.

As she watched the dramatic transformation she said: "I do like the new colour and that's why I chose it. But I still prefer the lilac, which I loved.

"I am grateful to Ted and Troy for all their help and it is nice to have a unique colour. Although I don't think it will change my life much I have always wanted something named after me. I still do not think I should have been forced to change the colour, it is traditional and there is nothing wrong with it."

St Edmundsbury officials are happy with the colour scheme, but it received a mixed reaction from Clare residents.

Landlady of the neighbouring Cock Inn, Lorna Harris, said: "I think the whole affair is a fuss about nothing, it was lovely the way it was before.

"We really liked the lilac, but the new colour is not very nice. I think the council has been very narrow minded about this. In other places like Colchester the historic houses are all sorts of colours and it brings the place to life. We wanted the lilac to stay and so did many other people."

Victoria Gilbert, 17, from Clare, said: "I liked the lilac, but I did think it was a bit bright for a house. I think the decision to change the colour was right and I think the pink is better."

Another Clare resident Pauline Holmes said: "I didn't dislike the lilac, but the new colour is quite nice. I suppose this was the best thing to do because now everybody is happy."

A spokesman for St Edmundsbury Borough Council said: "We have all agreed on a new colour which is more in keeping with the environment."

Although Daines' Pink now reigns supreme a small pig carved into the wall of the building remains the controversial shade of lilac.

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