Jazzman Kenny blasts Stanstred plans

FAMED jazz musician Kenny Ball has pledged his support to the Stop Stansted Expansion Campaign and called for the Government to look toward the Thames estuary for its plans instead.

FAMED jazz musician Kenny Ball has pledged his support to the Stop Stansted Expansion Campaign and called for the Government to look toward the Thames estuary for its plans instead.

The East Anglian airport is being considered for up to three extra runways in plans which could see houses demolished and the surrounding countryside dramatically changed.

The trumpeter and trombone player, famed for his Midnight in Moscow piece, yesterday pledged to appear at a campaign fundraising concert with his Jazzmen.

The 73-year-old who lives with wife Michelle, at Burton End, Broxted, said he loved being near to the airport but did not want to see any further expansion.

"I think it would be far better to put it in an area where there are no houses. I think they should look at the site in the Thames Estuary – I know there is terrific bird life there but they will eventually fly on and find somewhere else.

"We will do all we can to make the airport go somewhere else and I know somebody will suffer for it eventually but they need the work down in Kent," he said.

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He added his farmhouse was built in 1595 and it would be "sacrilege" to tear it down.

Kenny Ball and his Jazzmen will join the Upbeat Beatles in a concert to be held in the grounds of Little Easton Manor, near Great Dunmow in July.

Peter Gowan, deputy chairman of the Stop Stansted Expansion Campaign, said: "For once, we intend to drown out the noise of the planes and enjoy a fabulous festival of music and entertainment – lazing on a Sunday afternoon – in summertime. No speeches, banners or campaigning – just a great concert of international quality for everyone to enjoy – right on out doorstep."

Other highlights of the "Summer Breeze" event to be held on July 20 include a performance by the English Chamber Orchestra, directed by international conductor Roy Goodman.

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