Search

Jeremy Bamber launches new appeal to clear his name over White House Farm murders

PUBLISHED: 12:19 30 May 2020 | UPDATED: 12:19 30 May 2020

Jeremy Bamber, convicted of murdering his family at White House Farm, has launched a fresh appeal to clear his name  Picture: ANDREW HUNTER/PA WIRE/PA IMAGES

Jeremy Bamber, convicted of murdering his family at White House Farm, has launched a fresh appeal to clear his name Picture: ANDREW HUNTER/PA WIRE/PA IMAGES

PA Wire/PA Images

Jeremy Bamber is launching a new appeal to the High Court in a bid to have his murder convictions overturned.

Mr Bamber has protested his innocence since his trial in 1986  Picture: PA/PA ARCHIVEMr Bamber has protested his innocence since his trial in 1986 Picture: PA/PA ARCHIVE

The 59-year-old is serving life behind bars after being found guilty of murdering his adoptive parents, sister and two nephews – both aged six – at the family home in White House Farm, Essex, in 1985.

Mr Bamber has continually protested his innocence following their deaths, and claims his sister, Sheila Caffell – who suffered from schizophrenia – shot her family before turning the gun on herself.

Police had initially believed Mr Bamber’s version of events, however prosecutors later argued a silencer attached to the murder weapon meant she would not have been able to pull the trigger on herself.

He was later sentenced in 1986 for the murders of Nevill and June Bamber, both 61, Miss Caffell, and twins Daniel and Nicholas.

However Bamber’s lawyers now claim the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) had not disclosed material about a second silencer said to have been found at the farm, which they argue is relevant to his latest attempt to overturn his conviction.

Joe Stone QC, representing Bamber, told a remote High Court hearing on Friday that “it now seems almost certain that there is a second sound moderator”, suggesting it could be the “most important exhibit in the case” and “significantly undermine the prosecution”.

Mr Stone told Mr Justice Julian Knowles: “The prosecution case at trial was based exclusively on the point that there was only ever one sound moderator and that the specific factual circumstances in which this sound moderator was found and the nature of the blood grouping on it meant that Sheila Caffell could not have committed the murders and then taken her life.”

He added Mr Bamber would be “significantly handicapped” in mounting a fresh bid to overturn his conviction through the Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC), the independent body which investigates possible miscarriages of justice, without the evidence sought.

He also argued that “blood-based exhibits from Sheila Caffell’s DNA were destroyed by Essex Police in February 1996” as part of a “systematic destruction of core exhibits”.

Annabel Darlow QC, for the CPS, said in written submissions that claims of a second silencer had been looked into “extremely intensively”.

Ms Darlow added: “The alleged existence of two sound moderators, and the integrity of the exhibits relating to the examination of the sound moderator, have been the subject of exhaustive inquiry and review.”

She said the CPS “does not accept that the documents now sought were not previously disclosed or made available to the claimant”.

Mr Justice Julian Knowles reserved his judgement on Bamber’s application and said he hopes to give a written ruling next week.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the East Anglian Daily Times. Click the link in the orange box below for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years, through good times and bad, serving as your advocate and trusted source of local information. Our industry is facing testing times, which is why I’m asking for your support. Every single contribution will help us continue to produce award-winning local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Thank you.

Most Read

Comments have been disabled on this article.

Most Read

Latest from the East Anglian Daily Times