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Jubilee tree planted in Suffolk village

PUBLISHED: 05:04 19 February 2003 | UPDATED: 16:18 24 February 2010

AN ELM tree presented to a Suffolk town to commemorate the Golden Jubilee visit by the Queen has been planted.

The Royal Horticultural Society gave Bury St Edmunds the 15-foot high tree to mark the visit last summer - it was among dozens of other towns visited by the Queen during her 50th year on the throne to receive similar trees.

AN ELM tree presented to a Suffolk town to commemorate the Golden Jubilee visit by the Queen has been planted.

The Royal Horticultural Society gave Bury St Edmunds the 15-foot high tree to mark the visit last summer - it was among dozens of other towns visited by the Queen during her 50th year on the throne to receive similar trees. All of the towns presented with trees were also finalists in the Britain in Bloom competition.

The elm tree, a spectacular Ulnus "New Horizons" was planted close to the play area in the Abbey Gardens - the famous town park which was bathed in sunshine when the Queen and Prince Philip attended a special concert there as part of their visit to Bury.

It was planted by two apprentices from St Edmundsbury Borough Council's landscape team, Michelle Atkins and Ross Sanderson, together with the Chairman of the Bury in Bloom Committee, Mike Ames.

Michelle and Ross are just starting an 18-month modern apprenticeship scheme with the council as part of an innovative plan to bring more young people into the horticultural profession.

There is currently a national shortage of trained horticultural staff and this prompted St Edmundsbury to form a partnership with Suffolk's Otley College to offer modern apprenticeships to four young people over a three-year period.

Michelle and Ross are in the first phase of their apprenticeships and will be working towards an NVQ Level 2 qualification.


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