Killer Bamber sues family again

By James HoreMASS murderer Jeremy Bamber has launched a fresh claim for £325,000 compensation against four members of his family.Bamber was jailed for life in 1986 after he was found guilty of killing his adoptive parents, June and Nevill, his six-year-old nephews, Nicholas and Daniel, and his sister Sheila Caffell in Tolleshunt D'Arcy, near Maldon.

By James Hore

MASS murderer Jeremy Bamber has launched a fresh claim for £325,000 compensation against four members of his family.

Bamber was jailed for life in 1986 after he was found guilty of killing his adoptive parents, June and Nevill, his six-year-old nephews, Nicholas and Daniel, and his sister Sheila Caffell in Tolleshunt D'Arcy, near Maldon.

However, Bamber – who has been told he will never be released – has always maintained his innocence and believes he was convicted on flawed evidence.


You may also want to watch:


The latest writ issued from his prison cell is against his adopted aunt and uncle, Pamela and Robert Boutflour, his cousin, Ann Eaton, and the company secretary, Sarah Jane Eaton, for money which he claimed to be owed from shares he held with Osea Road Camp Sites Limited.

The company was set up and owned by Bamber's grandparents, Leslie and Mabel Speakman, and in the 1970s he was given 750 shares.

Most Read

But Bamber claimed since 1985 he had received no financial remuneration from the company, "contrary to the intentions" of his grandfather.

Bamber alleged he had been frozen out of the company by the actions of his family, claiming they had taken directors' fees and not paid any dividends.

The High Court writ claimed Osea Road Camp Sites Limited had made increasing profits since 1985 and he was owed, with interest, £325,709.

It added: "Since 1985 it is realistically estimated that the claimant's co-owners of Osea Road Camp Sites Limited have paid themselves £2,090,236 and paid him nothing at all."

His latest writ follows a unsuccessful action against the family for £1.27million after Bamber claimed he had been unfairly cut out of his grandmother's will.

Pamela Boutflour said last night her solicitors were dealing with the matter and added: "I had not really thought about it, we have just finished with the last one, it gets tiring.

"There is nothing to say at the moment – the last one was very satisfactory and I am sure this one won't be successful."

But Bamber said last night: "It is a legitimate claim and I will be pursuing it and as far as I can see I am entitled to it."

In August 1985, Bamber's mother and his six-year-old nephews were shot in their beds at Whitehouse Farm in Tolleshunt D'arcy.

His father Nevill was found dead downstairs, while the body of his sister Sheila Caffell, a model nicknamed Bambi, was discovered by her parents' bed.

Bamber had denied the murders, but was convicted in 1986 and jailed for life. His appeal against conviction was heard in 2002 and proved unsuccessful.

In a television documentary screened earlier this month, Ann Eaton spoke of her fears that she and her family would be "picked off" should Bamber ever be released.

Mrs Eaton, who now lives in the farmhouse where the killings took place, said: "We know that. It is more than just a fear, we know it."

However, since the programme was broadcast, Bamber's website has been inundated with hundreds of messages of support from people who believe the case against him was flawed and that he could be innocent.

james.hore@eadt.co.uk

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus