War hero meets family member for the first time on 100th birthday

Kitty celebrated her 100th birthday by seeing a family member for the very first time. 

Kitty Taylor received a letter from the Queen to celebrate her 100th birthday - Credit: Kraig Donald

A Second World War hero has celebrated her 100th birthday by meeting her great-great-grandnephew for the very first time. 

Kitty Taylor, a Women's Auxiliary Air Force veteran, met seven-month-old Rupert Marshall through a Covid-secure screen at St Mary's Court care home in Braintree.

Mrs Taylor also met with two of her nephews as they reminisced about her incredible life.

Kity was able to meet her great-great-grandnephew behind a Covid-secure screen at her care home.

Mrs Taylor was able to meet her great-great-grandnephew behind a Covid-secure screen at her care home - Credit: Kraig Donald

One of her nephews, Kraig Donald, said: "My auntie is an amazing woman who has seen so much over 100 years.

"Although she has developed dementia, she remembers much about the Second World War and the vital role she played.


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"She remembers vividly running across London Bridge during an air raid as flak rained down over the city. 

"During the day, she’d be on the rooftops spotting for planes. 

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"She’s an incredibly brave woman.” 

Kitty (right) with her fellow Women's Auxiliary Air Force servicewomen.  

Mrs Taylor, right, with her fellow Women's Auxiliary Air Force servicewomen - Credit: Kraig Donald

Mrs Taylor was born and raised in West London and was 19 when the war broke out. 

She joined the Women's Auxiliary Air Force when it was formed and was assigned to raise barrage balloons over the Borough High Street, to stop the advance of the German Bombers during the Blitz. 

After the war, Mrs Taylor travelled around the world, including to Germany.

She never received a medal for her work throughout the war and Mr Donald said she has always found that frustrating.

Mr Donald added: "She has always been a little annoyed that the women of the Women's Auxiliary Air Force did not receive any medals or recognition for their hard work, but she was so proud to have served her country." 

Once retired in the 1980s, she moved to Sible Hedingham, in Essex, with her husband William Taylor to be closer to Mr Donald. 

Kitty in her wartime uniform

Kitty Taylor in her wartime uniform - Credit: Kraig Donald

Following her husband's death, Mrs Taylor lived on her own up until 2018 when she moved into St Mary's Court care home. 

Julia Clinton, chief executive of Sonnet Care Homes, said: "We are blessed to have Kitty as part of the St Mary's Court family and are pleased we were able to help her celebrate being 100-years-old with those close to her."

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