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Cancer charity Macmillan could lose more than £200,000 from Suffolk coffee mornings

PUBLISHED: 07:04 15 September 2020 | UPDATED: 08:36 15 September 2020

Macmillan coffee mornings in Suffolk raised £306,000 last year, but are only expected to bring in a third of that this year. Picture: MACMILLAN

Macmillan coffee mornings in Suffolk raised £306,000 last year, but are only expected to bring in a third of that this year. Picture: MACMILLAN

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Cancer care could be hit by a £200,000 loss in income from Suffolk after charity Macmillan revealed that it expected to lose huge amounts from its annual coffee morning fundraiser.

Louise Smith is a Macmillan Cancer Information and Support Centre Manager at Ipswich Hospital. Picture: MACMILLANLouise Smith is a Macmillan Cancer Information and Support Centre Manager at Ipswich Hospital. Picture: MACMILLAN

The Macmillan Coffee Morning in September is one of the organisation’s biggest income generators, raising £306,000 in Suffolk every year.

Dozens of coffee mornings are usually held around the county but, amid the coronavirus crisis, more than two-thirds of coffee mornings this year are not expected to go ahead.

The charity believes its income from the event will fall by 70%, the equivalent of £127,473 in Suffolk.

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Macmillan were there when Ruth Godfrey,  from Barham, needed their support after being diagnosed with breast cancer and seeing her dad pass away with cancer in less than six months. Picture: RUTH GODFREYMacmillan were there when Ruth Godfrey, from Barham, needed their support after being diagnosed with breast cancer and seeing her dad pass away with cancer in less than six months. Picture: RUTH GODFREY

Louise Smith, a Macmillan information and support centre manager at Ipswich Hospital, has encouraged people to hold events where they can in a safe and socially-distanced way.

“When you hold a coffee morning – whether socially-distanced or virtual – you’re helping people like me deliver the very best support we can,” she said.

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“The pandemic has brought a great deal of extra stress for people living with cancer.

“They worry about contracting the virus with a weakened immune system, and how they can access financial and practical support when it feels like the whole world has turned on its head.

“Without the donations raised by events like Macmillan’s coffee morning, specialist cancer services like ours wouldn’t exist today. It’s as simple as that.”

Ruth Godfrey, from Barham, was diagnosed with breast cancer at the end of last year and said: “Macmillan has been a huge part of helping me through lockdown, chemotherapy and cancer during these past few months.

“They’ve been at the end of a phone line for advice not only for me, but also my family - especially when my dad passed away in April with cancer while I was in the middle of treatment myself.”

The 55-year-old is going to hold a ‘Macmillan Marvellous Mindset Morning’ instead of a coffee morning this year, as an online virtual event where she will give free positive mindset training in exchange for donations.

The charity is now encouraging people to take part however they can, from socially distanced coffee mornings to virtual meetings online.

To organise one of your own, head to the Macmillan Cancer Support website here.

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