Mass murderer's 'new evidence' claim

CONVICTED mass-murderer Jeremy Bamber believes a new piece of evidence unearthed by his legal team could help set him free. It was 20 years go this week that Bamber was jailed for life after being found guilty of murdering his adoptive parents, Nevill and June, sister Shelia Caffell, and her two young twins, Nicholas and Daniel, both six.

CONVICTED mass-murderer Jeremy Bamber believes a new piece of evidence unearthed by his legal team could help set him free.

It was 20 years go this week that Bamber was jailed for life after being found guilty of murdering his adoptive parents, Nevill and June, sister Shelia Caffell, and her two young twins, Nicholas and Daniel, both six.

Police initially suspected Ms Caffell, a paranoid schizophrenic, was responsible for the killings at White House Farm in Tolleshunt D'Arcy, near Colchester, before turning the gun on herself.

But after surviving members of the family discovered a silencer from the murder weapon tucked into a cupboard at the isolated farm, suspicion fell on Bamber who stood to inherit the family fortune.


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Evidence suggests an intense struggle took place in the kitchen between Nevill Bamber and the killer, with prosecutors suggesting it would not have been possible for Sheila to overpower her father who stood more than 6ft tall.

But documents released to the Bamber legal team claim Nevill had been paralysed by a bullet to his shoulder.

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The paperwork allegedly reveals police officers and doctors who discussed the case prior to the trial at Chelmsford Crown Court believed Nevill's arm was completely paralysed and “useless” as a result of the wound.

Speaking to the EADT from Full Sutton Prison in York, Bamber said he believed it helped prove Sheila could have overpowered Nevill during the struggle in the kitchen.

He said: “I think the defence should have been made aware of this evidence, and so should the jury. I think it would have had major consequences because it shows how he could have been overpowered.”

He said information about times of deaths would also help clear his name, but said because details of post-mortems had been “lost” since the inquest took place, that was not possible.

Recently Bamber offered to take a lie-detector test because he was confident it would help prove his innocence.

The Criminal Cases Review Commission is currently reviewing the evidence before announcing if Bamber has been granted another Court of Appeal hearing.

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