New bungalows and retirement homes could be built at farm

Designs showing how the retirement homes and bungalows would be built

Designs showing how the retirement homes and bungalows would be built - Credit: McCarthy Stone

A retirement complex of apartments and bungalows could be built on land at a farm - to help deal with a growing demand for housing for elderly people.

McCarthy Stone has launched a consultation with residents on plans to build 43 new apartments and 10 bungalows at Dairy Farm, Halesworth.

Matt Wills, divisional managing director Midlands for McCarthy Stone, said the plans "provide a fantastic opportunity to deliver much-needed retirement living accommodation in Halesworth, along with community benefits".

The homes would be built near to shops and services, with on-site parking available and residents benefiting from landscaped gardens, as well as a residents' lounge.

However, McCarthy Stone said it would also transfer part of the land to Halesworth Town Council - so it can be put to community use.


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"The site is ideally located for residents to access local shops and services, with nearby bus routes into the town centre and the train station providing transport links across the wider region,” Mr Wills said.

“We’re proposing a sensitive design that respects the character of the local area and we want to hear local views on our proposals before we finalise our planning application."

People who want to have their say should visit the consultation website at www.mccarthyandstoneconsultation.co.uk/halesworth

McCarthy Stone is also set to start building a new retirement complex on the site of the East Anglian Daily Times' former office in Lower Brook Street, Ipswich.

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The firm had originally pulled out of the project but this year confirmed work would be going ahead after all.

There will be 25 one-bedroom apartments and 26 two-bedroom apartments in the Ipswich development, as well as 11 two-bedroom cottages.

The first sales are not expected to be completed until the autumn of 2022, with residents not expected to move in  until during the first half of 2023.

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