Metal fence causes uproar in village

RESIDENTS of a picturesque coastal Essex village are up in arms about a new fence that has been erected along part of an historic quayside.

Elliot Furniss

RESIDENTS of a picturesque coastal Essex village are up in arms about a new fence that has been erected along part of an historic quayside.

Many people in Mistley, near Manningtree, are furious that the firm that owns part of the waterfront, Trent Wharfage Ltd, has decided to install the two metre high metal fence on its land.

They feel it has blocked access for people who use the area for parking or mooring their boats and spoils the view for many people in the village.


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Nobody from the firm was available for comment last night but residents said they had been told by staff that the fence had been erected for “health and safety” reasons.

Nancy Bell lives on Mistley High Street and said her view of the “stunning” estuary landscape, immortalised in the work of famous artist John Constable, had been greatly affected.

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She said: “We'll be looking out onto a two metre metal fence instead of the estuary. It's having a huge impact already and in my view has made the road more dangerous - lorries have got much less space to move along because of the fence.”

She said the location of the fence could also have implications for anyone who runs into trouble on the estuary and needs the help of the emergency services.

Mrs Bell added: “The view has been unchanged for 200 years and is one of the great views of East Anglia. But it has completely changed overnight. It's mindless.”

Richard Brunning, who runs the Mistley Quay Café that overlooks the area, said there had been talk a month ago about extending a temporary fence but many people in the village were left surprised when the fence appeared.

“There are 50 or 60 people who won't be able to park their cars and private boats won't be able to moor there,” he said. “It's restricting access and people are so angry and upset about it. We have had people crying as boats will no longer ever be able to moor along here.”

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