Moot Hall's hidden secrets

FROM the outside, there is nothing to suggest the unique and interesting history which Moot Hall conceals.The 15th Century Grade Two listed hall stands by the seafront on the Marine Parade in Clacton, and is currently on sale for £525,000.

FROM the outside, there is nothing to suggest the unique and interesting history which Moot Hall conceals.

The 15th Century Grade Two listed hall stands by the seafront on the Marine Parade in Clacton, and is currently on sale for £525,000.

Yet, for hundreds of years, the house stood miles away in the grounds of Horstead Place, near Bury St Edmunds.

Incredibly, in 1910 it was moved, brick-by-brick and timber-by-timber, from its old home and rebuilt in Clacton.


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In Bury, the house had been used as a courtroom and granary before it was drawn to the attention of two directors of Christies, Gill and Reigat, who wanted a Tudor house by the sea.

And so it was, on their whim, that Moot Hall was demolished, with every last piece being labelled and taken to Clacton by horse-drawn cart, where it was lovingly restored.

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Once there, the owners made do without a staircase for 24 years, before they bought and installed wooden stairs which were formerly part of London's Waterloo Bridge.

Now complete, the three-storey building boasts original features including exposed beams and open fireplaces.

It has five bedrooms, two bathrooms, a dining room, lounge, kitchen and a conservatory spread out over the floors, while outside stands a walled garden and a pond.

Doug Watson, proprietor of Essex Country and Village Homes, which is marketing the historic property, said interest was already running high.

"We've had several viewings so far and it's only just come on the market," he added. "It's certainly a very unique house in the area – you don't get many Tudor homes on the seafront.

"The fact that it was moved in the way in which it was just adds to the interest surrounding it."

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