Murdered journalist inquest delayed

THE family of murdered Suffolk journalist Kate Peyton face a further six month delay before an inquest into her death is held.The 39-year-old BBC producer, who grew up in west Suffolk, was gunned down in the Somalian capital Mogadishu in February 2005.

THE family of murdered Suffolk journalist Kate Peyton face a further six month delay before an inquest into her death is held.

The 39-year-old BBC producer, who grew up in west Suffolk, was gunned down in the Somalian capital Mogadishu in February 2005.

She was murdered just hours after arriving in the African state.

Her family originally hoped an inquest into her death would be held last year, but now they face a further wait of about six months until an inquest is held.


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Her brother Charles said: “We've been told that, for various reasons, it is unlikely to be held for a further five or six months.

“The reasons are that the coroner has been very busy with the Ipswich murders and we are still gathering evidence from people who might testify.

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“Our barrister reckons it won't be held until about six months from now, though there will be a pre inquest hearing which will be public.

“It is not ideal, but the problem we are finding is that everybody we speak to produces three or four more people we need to follow up.”

He added the family were hoping the scope of the inquest would go beyond the strict cause of death.

Mr Peyton said it was hoped the inquest would look at health and safety issues surrounding her assignment in Somalia.

Once a date is fixed, the inquest is expected to take between one and two weeks.

Before her death, Ms Peyton had travelled to Somalia with BBC reporter Peter Greste to make a series of reports on the troubled east African country.

It is thought she was shot in the back by a militiaman, despite being under guard. Mr Greste was chased but escaped in a car and was unharmed.

Ms Peyton had worked for the BBC as a producer and reporter for 12 years and was based in Johannesburg.

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