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Could former Ipswich pumping station have new life as three homes?

PUBLISHED: 16:30 03 June 2019

The former Whitton Pumping station. Picture: Vision Design and Planning Consutants

The former Whitton Pumping station. Picture: Vision Design and Planning Consutants

Archant

A former water plant on the edge of Ipswich could be converted into three individual homes if planners agree to a redevelopment proposal.

An architect's drawing of the pumping station as it is at present. Picture: Vison Design and Planning ConsultantsAn architect's drawing of the pumping station as it is at present. Picture: Vison Design and Planning Consultants

The former Whitton Pumping Station has been abandoned since the early 1990s when Anglian Water developed a new pump a short distance away to get water to north west Ipswich.

The site has been derelict, and largely forgotten, for about 25 years - but now development company D & K Properties has applied for permission to carry out the conversion.

This would create three family homes on the site - two three-bedroomed house and one with four bedrooms.

They would each have rooms on three flours, and there would be three garages and other parking spaces at the back of the homes.

An architect's impression of the new homes in the former pumping station. Picture: Vision Design and Planning ConsultantsAn architect's impression of the new homes in the former pumping station. Picture: Vision Design and Planning Consultants

The application is not in line with the council's current guidelines, but there have been extensive negotiations between the developers and council officials to try to come up with a proposal that is likely to be acceptable.

A spokesman for the company's planning consultants said they were hopeful about the outcome because it would see a fine building that has been abandoned for about 25 years brought back into life.

The pumping station was built in 1913 for Ipswich Corporation to provide water to the north west of the town - and became very important when the Whitton and Castle Hill estates were built between the wars.

It was transferred to Anglian Water in the early 1970s - but it became redundant 20 years later when they developed a larger and more modern pumping station behind the building.

The building is not listed by the government, however it is included in the borough's own "local list" as a structure of significance for the town, and something they would like to see preserved.

The planning application is expected to be discussed by the borough's planning and development committee during the summer, and there will have to be a full debate because it is in contravention of the local plan.

However it is understood that officers feel they have had constructive talks with the developers and it is possible that they may end up recommending approval of their plans to make it possible to save the potentially attractive building.

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