New steps to keep kids fit

Five Suffolk schools are to take part in a new scheme designed to tackle childhood obesity.Children at the Ipswich schools are being given pedometers in a Government-backed scheme called Schools on the Move.

Five Suffolk schools are to take part in a new scheme designed to tackle childhood obesity.

Children at the Ipswich schools are being given pedometers in a Government-backed scheme called Schools on the Move.

Public health minister Caroline Flint launched the scheme today, which will 9000 of the devices, which measure the number of steps taken, handed out to pupils aged nine to 14 years in around 50 schools across England.

Ms Flint said: “Childhood obesity is a serious issue which the government is determined to tackle on a number of fronts including increasing levels of physical activity. Pedometers are effective in motivating people to become more active. Schools on the Move takes this further by incorporating the information children gain from pedometers into lessons like maths, science, art and geography, making the distance they walk and the number of steps they take relevant across the school curriculum not just in PE and school sports.


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"Every little bit of extra physical activity we incorporate into our lives can make a huge difference in terms of health improvement. By raising awareness of the importance of physical activity amongst teachers and pupils and by encouraging children to become more active, we hope to make big strides in reducing childhood obesity."

Schools involved in the scheme include Copleston High School, Northgate High School, St Helen's Primary, St Margaret's C of E Primary and Britannia Primary School.

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