How are high-tech Suffolk students using robotics?

Pupils at Newmarket Academy are learning to use robotics to help them teach younger students about s

Pupils at Newmarket Academy are learning to use robotics to help them teach younger students about science and technology Picture: WEST SUFFOLK COUNCIL - Credit: West Suffolk Council

Schoolchildren in Suffolk are taking part in a scheme using robotics to encourage interested in science and technology.

Pupils at Newmarket Academy are learning to use robotics to help them teach younger students about s

Pupils at Newmarket Academy are learning to use robotics to help them teach younger students about science and technology Picture: WEST SUFFOLK COUNCIL - Credit: West Suffolk Council

Youngsters at Newmarket Academy have teamed up with West Suffolk Council and BT Adastral Park's Schools Outreach Programme to show students some of the exciting things science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) can be used for.

The outreach team will train the students in computer science using a robotics kit funded by West Suffolk Council.

Those students will then go on to teach the subject to local primary schools using robotics to give the younger students and their teachers an introduction to coding and programming.

The scheme will also give Newmarket Academy students volunteering experience for their CVs.

Pupils at Newmarket Academy are learning to use robotics to help them teach younger students about s

Pupils at Newmarket Academy are learning to use robotics to help them teach younger students about science and technology Picture: WEST SUFFOLK COUNCIL - Credit: West Suffolk Council


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If successful the scheme could eventually be rolled out to other parts of West Suffolk.

Julie Baird, assistant director for growth at West Suffolk Council said: "We are looking to create a legacy, developing that spark of passion in STEM subjects at an early age.

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"Our hope is that by working with older students interested in STEM subjects that they can cultivate and inspire that same excitement in primary school children. "Not only that, the project can also help empower teachers who may not be experts themselves in the computer sciences, allowing that knowledge and enthusiasm for these key subjects to continue to expand and develop for future years."

Lisa Perkins, director of Adastral Park and Research Realisation at BT, said: "We are delighted to be working with West Suffolk Council and Newmarket Academy.

"Our own research shows that by demonstrating how STEM subjects can be fun, we can help get primary school youngsters interested and thinking about these subjects from a much earlier age.

"That in turn means more students are likely to continue studying these subjects are a higher level and take up STEM related jobs when they leave education."

Helen Haridge, a science teacher at Newmarket Academy, said: "As well as benefitting the study of STEM subjects, this also presents a wonderful opportunity for some of our students to mentor younger pupils, which contributes not just to their confidence and the educational success of the school but also to the Academy's culture, of students that care and look out for others.

"That's why I'm delighted that the Academy is part of this initiative which I'm sure will be a big success."

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