Pet cockatiel saves man's life

A STROKE victim from Essex has revealed how his pet cockatiel helped save his life.

James Hore

A STROKE victim from Essex has revealed how his pet cockatiel helped save his life.

Brian Molineaux was at his home near Chelmsford when he was struck by a stroke which left him sprawled on the floor and unable to get up.

The 72-year-old was tangled up with his chair and struggled desperately to get up but was unable to because his weight was on his arm.


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But as Mr Molineaux lay dying on the floor, his cockatiel of 17 years, Budgie, kicked up such a fuss and alerted his wife to the drama.

Mr Molineaux said: “Monday the 2nd of March was like every Monday.

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“It was a little after 8.30am and it was time for some green tea.

“Then it all went wrong, I was sprawled across the floor, tangled up with my chair, unable to get up despite my struggles. Of course I was lying on my right arm and if I could only free that then I could get up.

“The arm didn't want to move, nor did my right leg, I was frustrated, powerless and voiceless too.

“Now this gets surreal, my 17-year-old cockatiel likes her seed and water changed in the mornings and grumbles when I don't do it immediately.

“Unknown to me she was getting quite vocal which brought my wife downstairs to find out why I wasn't answering the bird.”

Shirley Molineaux realised immediately that her husband could have suffered a stroke and called an ambulance that took Brian to Broomfield Hospital where he was met by the stroke team.

Mr Molineaux, of Alder Drive, Chelmsford, became the first patient to be treated at the hospital's new stroke unit which was officially opened last week.

He was also given a revolutionary new clot busting drug, alteplase, which is used to dissolve blood clots but is only effective within the first three hours of the stroke.

Mr Molineaux spent four days on the stroke unit undergoing various tests and sessions with the physiotherapists before being discharged.

He said: “I now know that I could have been suffering the problems of stroke patients that I have known in the past.

“I have been lucky, very lucky. However with the right physician and facilities; the right treatment recently becoming available; and dare I say my perfect timing it has been a miracle for me, and my family and friends.”

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