Police probe into speeding tractors claim

WHEN the police are called about speeding drivers, they might be forgiven for expecting the alleged culprits to be driving fast cars or powerful motorbikes.

Laurence Cawley

WHEN the police are called about speeding drivers, they might be forgiven for expecting the alleged culprits to be driving fast cars or powerful motorbikes.

But recently, in the village of Thurston, near Bury St Edmunds, the police have received a number of complaints about tractors allegedly going too fast.

Thurston Parish Council yesterday said it was aware of the issue and had voiced its concerns. It is calling for new signs to be put up on Heath Road, which is where a number of residents and motorists have reported problems. Heath Road stretches from a residential area, which has a children's play area nearby, onto a single-track section of the road which leads towards the railway lines.


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A spokeswoman for the police said: “The Mid Suffolk South Safer Neighbourhood Team has received complaints from residents and people using this stretch of road that they believe tractors are exceeding the speed limit.

“Officers have visited the area and spoken to the landowner, advice has been passed to him and will be passed on to the drivers.”

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The village's police community support officer has been out monitoring the road but to date nobody has been stopped for speeding.

As well as continuing to monitor the situation, the parish council is to approach Suffolk County Council to inquire about either getting the road re-classified or having new signs installed along the single-track section.

Andrew Sprake, parish council chairman, said: “The problem is at the end of Heath Road where it is single-track and we were concerned because as you come down Heath Road there is the playing field which children use.

“It goes from a 30mph limit in the residential area up to the national speed limit when it becomes just a track which leads up to the railway crossing. It has been a little bit of a problem.”

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