Power plant investigation launched

THE Environment Agency is investigating claims that emissions from a power plant fuelled by chicken litter are causing dust pollution and noxious smells.

THE Environment Agency is investigating claims that emissions from a power plant fuelled by chicken litter are causing dust pollution and noxious smells.

Samples have been taken from Eye power station following a complaint from businessman Carl Humphrey, who runs a vehicle sales and repair centre at nearby Brome.

He took action after cars were covered in an ashy black deposit and staff reported feeling ill because of the stench.

The Eye power plant was the first in the world to use chicken waste to generate power, and provides electricity for 15,000 homes through the national grid.


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There were problems with the smoke plume when it opened 12 years ago, and remedial measures were taken.

Work is also planned next summer to reduce sulphur dioxide emissions.

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Mr Humphrey said: “The power station manager is saying by this time next year any problems we have got will be solved, and I am saying have my staff got to put up with this smell for 12 months?

“We have never once, in the 30 years the family business has been in the area, complained to try and stop anyone else. It's live and let live, but we value our staff and cannot ignore their comments.”

He discounted a suggestion that the deposit on the cars was oil from vehicles using the nearby A140 road.

Power station manager Steve Brown said: “I went over to look at the vehicles which Mr Humphrey complained about, and told him about the measures we are putting in place to improve emissions at the site.

“The plant conforms to its authorisation and we are fully regulated. The Environment Agency has taken samples and will report back at some point.”

An earlier complaint by Mr Humphrey about a smell from the plant had been investigated, but was found to come from sewage on nearby farm fields, he added.

Environment Agency spokesman Richard Woolard said: “Ash can come from all sorts of different places. The most obvious would be Fibropower but that is not always the case.”

It could be several months before the results of the tests are known.

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