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African pygmy hedgehog abandoned in Suffolk garden finds new home

PUBLISHED: 13:30 20 September 2020

Animal Unit Technician team lader Jen Dow with Bramble the pygmy hedgehog. Picture: JOHN NICE

Animal Unit Technician team lader Jen Dow with Bramble the pygmy hedgehog. Picture: JOHN NICE

Archant

A six-month-old orphaned hedgehog, found abandoned in a Suffolk garden, has found a new home where she will get to meet lots of new friends.

Shadow the chinchilla at Suffolk Rural. Picture: JOHN NICEShadow the chinchilla at Suffolk Rural. Picture: JOHN NICE

Bramble, an African Pygmy hedgehog, has been taken in by Suffolk Rural college where students will learn all about her unique behaviours.

Jen Dow, Animal Unit Technician team leader at the college, said: “We are delighted to have her. She is nocturnal so this will teach our students about different animal sleeping patterns.

MORE: Watch as hedgehog hospital patients get released back into the wild

“Her diet is also unlike her European hedgehog counterparts so our students will also be able to learn about this.”

Sting the scorpion at Suffolk Rural. Picture: JOHN NICESting the scorpion at Suffolk Rural. Picture: JOHN NICE

The college have a number of links with local charities and rescue homes, as well as a selective rescue project with several organisations.

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So far, the project has seen the arrival of a scorpion, a hamster, some chinchillas and four cockatiels to the animal unit at the campus based eight miles outside of Ipswich.

The college also plans to continue its ongoing relationship with Jimmy’s Farm to provide students with work experience opportunities and rehome animals.

Luna the cockatiel at Suffolk Rural. Picture: JOHN NICELuna the cockatiel at Suffolk Rural. Picture: JOHN NICE

Recent work with Poppy’s Creche in Stowmarket will see more even hedgehogs take up residence at Suffolk Rural later in the year.

Miss Dow added: “Whilst we have welcomed some animals, we are also thrilled to have welcomed back students – both new and old – to our new safe Covid secure working environment.

“It’s given the unit its purpose back and the animals appreciate the extra attention they receive.”

The number of 16 to 18 year olds studying on animal courses has risen by 11% at the college, going from 150 learners last year to 166 this year.

MORE: Meet Albie the giant bunny rabbit living in Suffolk


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